Vitamin E

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Vitamin E

Postby Canuck Singh » Sat Jun 14, 2008 8:45 pm

Vitamin e - immune defence

Vitamin E is an essential component of the body's defense against harmful effects of free radicals. And recent epidemiological studies suggest it even plays an important role in coronary artery disease prevention. This review summarized the recent findings on vitamin E supplementation with humans and shows an emerging trend in research - that while vitamin E supplementation may not act as a direct sports performance enhancer, its primary function for athletes is to prevent oxidative damage during times of increased free radical production (such as exercise).

There is a 10-20 fold increase in oxygen consumption during exercise and this increases free radical production. It is still not completely clear and it is debatable if this increase in free radical production causes a detrimental effect - peroxidation (damage to cells) during exercise. However, a lot of evidence strongly supports this notion and it does appear that vitamin E supplementation enhances the antioxidant system and is beneficial to the reduction in oxidative damage during exercise.

In studies involving assessment of muscular damage from exercise, serum creatine kinase and mitochondial enzyme indicators associated with tissue damage are reduced with vitamin E dosages between 100-800IU per day. However, because muscular damage is multifactorial and free radicals are only part of this picture, much more research needs to be done before conclusions can be drawn.

The strongest case for vitamin E supplementation during exercise is found in literature that shows it reduces whole body peroxidation (damage to lipid membranes of cells) with dosages of 1200IUs per day. Also, healthy young males undertaking exercise while supplementing with between 300mg and 592mgs a day prevented a decrease in serum TBARS levels; a commonly reported indicator for peroxidation. Vitamin E supplementation, 294mg a day during running training also raised the antioxidant potential that protects against LDL (low density lipoprotein) levels, the ones that cause coronary disease.

All in all, vitamin E supplementation appears to be a safe bet. Dosages should be between 100 and 500mg daily for fit athletes . Interestingly, the researchers recommend that "weekend warriors", those that do not train regularly, may need to take more. Unlike their more fit counterparts, those that don’t train regularly do not possess upgraded antioxidant defenses so they may be exposing themselves to more free radical damage when they exercise.

Ref: Vitamin E supplementation and endurance exercise. Sports Med.(2):73-83,2000.
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Re: Vitamin E

Postby Canuck Singh » Sat Oct 25, 2008 10:30 am

Over the last decade, the research on vitamin E supplementation and its antioxidant capacity has proved to be at best, equivocal. Some have shown great benefit while some have shown no benefits. However, all of these studies could prove to be meaningless.

New research has demonstrated that the levels of this micronutrient necessary to reduce oxidative stress are far higher than those that have been commonly used in clinical trials.

In a new study published in Free Radical Biology and Medicine this month, researchers concluded that the levels of vitamin E necessary to reduce oxidative stress, as measured by accepted biomarkers of lipid peroxidation, are about 1,600 to 3,200 I.U. daily. That’s four to eight times higher than those used in almost all previous clinical trials.

This could help explain the inconsistent results of vitamin E studies.

In a commentary in the journal, Balz Frei, Professor and director of the Linus Pauling Institute at Oregon State University, proposed that the methodology used in almost all previous clinical trials with vitamin E has been fatally flawed. The results could be meaningless.

The level of vitamin E that can reduce oxidative stress is far higher than the level that could be obtained in any diet, and is also above the "tolerable upper intake level" outlined by the Institute of Medicine, which is 1,000 I.U. a day.

Some human studies using lower levels of vitamin E supplements, such as 100 to 400 I.U. a day, have shown benefits in reducing cardiovascular disease risk, and others have not. An underlying assumption was that these levels were more than adequate to reduce oxidative stress, since they far exceeded the "recommended dietary allowance" or RDA for the vitamin. Now, it appears that the results of all the previous work on vitamin E may not be relevant
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Re: Vitamin E

Postby Canuck Singh » Mon Nov 10, 2008 7:47 pm

Apart from the well documented effects that vitamin E prevents cellular damage (associated with the aging process) supplementation with vitamin E has recently been shown to protect/ preserve critical DHEA levels in the brain. We know that dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) levels within the body protect against an entire range of age-related diseases from cancer to arteriosclerosis. However, DHEA levels within the brain is a known determinant of "brain health" and "brain aging". It is suspected that preserving DHEA levels in the brain may delay the onset of many mental degenerative diseases associated with "getting older".

Recently, Japanese researchers performed an elegant study on the effects of vitamin E on brain DHEA levels in rodents and published the results in the Journal of Nutritional Biochemistry (1998;9:339-343). The results showed that a vitamin E deficient diet significantly reduced brain (adrenal) DHEA levels. That in fact, not enough vitamin E in the diet does affect the amount of this vital prohormone in the brain. Also, more importantly, this study showed that supplementation with vitamin E restored normal DHEA levels. However, using more vitamin E did not increase adrenal DHEA levels beyond normal values, so mega dosing vitamin E in this instance is no good.

It does appear that the lipid-rich adrenals are very susceptible to damage by free radicals and the accumulation of lipid peroxidation products may decrease the production of DHEA as we age. Therefore getting enough antioxidants may help prevent oxidative damage to the sensitive adrenals and preserve brain DHEA levels. And this may prevent many diseases.
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Re: Vitamin E

Postby Canuck Singh » Sun Mar 29, 2009 4:00 pm

One of vitamin E’s greatest attributes is its ability to inhibit inflammation in most tissues, including muscle. The anti-inflammatory effect of vitamin E may help speed recovery after intense exercise and help prevent arteriosclerosis – the buildup of plaque on artery walls which promotes heart disease.

Interestingly, most people don’t get enough vitamin E in their diet. According to a study published in the Journal of the American Dietetic Association, most men and women don’t even get the Recommended Daily Allowance (RDA) of E which is 15milligrams a day.

An anti-inflammatory response has been observed with a dose of 500 to 1000 milligrams of E daily, so this amount for athletes, maybe a good start. However, people that don’t train regularly do not possess the upgraded antioxidant defense systems that athletes do - they may be exposing themselves to more cellular damage during exercise. Therefore, people new to exercise or those that do not exercise regularly, may need even more vitamin E than athletes.
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Re: Vitamin E

Postby Andrew » Fri Jan 13, 2012 7:13 am

Vitamin e is best to prevent A,B and C. Vitamin E is good for skin. It is an important element of our body. Any deficiency of this vitamin can causes lot of health problems.
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Re: Vitamin E

Postby Carter » Fri Apr 05, 2013 9:44 am

Supplement C increases resistance system,
Vitamin C stops from cardiac arrest, Supplement C battle and prevent against cancer....
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