The 7 Biggest Mistakes People Make in the Gym

Every other type of training here, including stretching, different training styles.

The 7 Biggest Mistakes People Make in the Gym

Postby jago » Thu Jan 08, 2009 5:59 pm

Avoid these gym mistakes, and make 2009 your year to be healthier than ever.

Ok, you have done it. You have dragged yourself off the couch, and now you are looking to attack the New Year. For most people, exercising more will a top priority. I wanted to breakdown the most common mistakes I see in the gym, so you can make 2009 your year to be healthier than ever.

Mistake #1: No Goals
Business Guru Brian Tracy says “If you don’t have goals for yourself, you are doomed to work to achieve the goals of someone else.” You need to have one, and dream big. Lose 10 pounds. Complete your first 10K, half marathon or marathon. Lower your percentage of body fat to fewer than 20. You need something. Not having a goal is like sailing a ship without a rudder. You will just be pushed where the wind takes you. You need to have a direction. You need to take charge of the boat and maintain the direction you want to go, and make course corrections as you go.


Mistake #2: Too Much Cardio

Aerobic exercise is widely recognized as the ideal vehicle for fat loss. Surprisingly, this is not the case. Regularly I see people going to the treadmill, doing the same speed, the same intensity, day in and day out. Truth be told, aerobic exercise is over-hyped. Why? One reason, which might be hard to except, is monetary. Think of all the gyms around the world and how much money they spend on cardiovascular equipment. A typical commercial treadmill will cost between $10,000 - $14,000 depending upon the make. In our gym, these pieces of equipment tend to have a lifespan of 4-7 years. We have close to 50 pieces of cardiovascular equipment, so you can figure out the math. However, a set of dumbbells from 15lbs to 80lbs cost less than $5,000, and guess how long those things last? Decades! The fitness industry is a big business. Do they have an interest in ensuring that you believe walking on a treadmill or on a Stairmaster is the best way to trim down those thighs? You bet they do, and a lot of the information published supports that.


However, there is more and more evidence showing that you do not need to spend 30 plus minutes in the gym working at a low intensity on a cardio machine. Dr. Izumi Tabata is creating quite a buzz with the Medical Sports Journals on his interval based approach (more on this below). Always doing the same speed, intensity, incline, etc will give you more of the same results.


Mistake #3: Not Enough Weights
If you want results you should be including more weights into your circuit! Even bodyweight exercises such as squats, lunges, push-ups, pull-ups, are fantastic exercises that have been forgotten (and exercise companies can’t make a lot of money on them).


As I mentioned above, Dr. Izumi Tabata has come up with solid evidence that interval training (20 seconds of high intensity work, followed by 10 seconds of rest and repeated eight times) has enormous benefits for your overall strength and fat loss. Try doing the method I just mentioned using the simple bodyweight squat. Do as many as you can – with good form – in 20 seconds. Then rest for 10 seconds. Do this a total of 8 times. Follow that by 4 minutes of skipping. This is a fantastic, fat burning workout that takes less than 10 minutes, and needs no equipment.


Mistake #4: Poor Technique
The number of people I see doing exercises poorly is mind boggling. There are a number of reasons for this; the biggest reason being is that working out is work! To do things correctly, you need to put your body in an uncomfortable state of being, something the ego doesn’t like doing. The ego thinks, and will probably try and to convince you that at least you made it to the gym, that should be victory enough. Your body will naturally try and choose the easier way of doing things. It’s nice that your body wants to do that for you, and in most cases let it, just not at the gym.


Poor technique includes those people, I call them cheaters, who do an exercise and do not go through a full range of motion. They do half of a bicep curl, half a push-up, or part of a dumbbell fly. Going through a full range of motion will strengthen your muscles in the entire range. Not going through the full range only strengthen them in the limited range you work in, which leaves your muscles susceptible to injury within the ranges you do not work them in.

Another reason for the lack of full range is people are lifting way too much weight. Lower the weight and do it properly. Your muscles will benefit way more from it, and your ego will learn to deal with it.


Mistake #5: Not Hiring a Personal Trainer

Fixing #4 can be easy, hire a professional that has chosen a career in teaching others how to exercise properly and get the best bang for your time in the gym. There are different ways you can use a trainer, depending upon what your needs are. Here are three common scenarios that I see for people looking to hire a trainer:


1. The “I Need an Appointment to get me here” Client: This person likes to have a trainer 1-2x/week because they know that if they did not have a set appointment, they would not ever make it to the gym. Just knowing that they would get charged if they did not make it is reason enough to get to the gym, no matter what kind of day they thought they had.


2. The “I Need a Kick in the <beauty>” Client: This person books a train for 5-6 sessions over the course of 2-3 weeks. They want someone to kick start them into gear and know that once they see a bit of a benefit they will have the discipline to keep going on the path of wellness on their own.


3. The “I Need a Check-Up” Client: This person will commit to three or four sessions over a two week period – an assessment and goal counselling session, a run through of their program that has been written for them, and then a second run through to ensure the clients technique is proper. After a month or so, they may come back and get a new program from the trainer to mix things up.
All three of these scenarios can work – depending upon the needs you may have and knowing what has and has not worked in the past.


Mistake #6: Hiring a Poor Trainer

There are people in every line of the service industry, from construction to restaurants to personal training that do not give the service you expect. I witnessed two incidents firsthand, at two different popular gyms in Toronto, which I would like to share with you:


• I was watching a trainer working with a client. The client was overweight and could probably lose at least 70+ pounds. Over the course of about 15 minutes (assuming it was a one hour session that is ¼ of their time) they did three different calf exercises with three sets for each exercise. Calf exercises! Unless that client had some kind of strength issue in her calf that was critical perhaps to the job she performed then those were obviously the wrong exercises for her. The client needed to lose weight, and doing calf raises three different ways was not going to achieve that goal.


• I observed a trainer sitting on an exercise bench watching his client doing push-ups on the floor. He had a cup of coffee in his hand. He counted to ten, and then told his client, “Ok, do another ten, I’m just going to get another cup of coffee.”


Here are some things to consider when you meet with a trainer, or currently have one:


1. Are they in good shape themselves? All trainers don’t need to look like Arnold Schwarzenegger, but they need to have good energy levels and look fit and healthy. Do you really want to be set up with a trainer who does not listen to their own advice?
2. Do they ask you for your goals and what you are trying to achieve?
3. Do they make your workouts fresh and fun?
4. Do they genuinely care about your progress?
5. Do they provide good answers to the questions you ask?
6. Do they have a good team of professionals that they work with – holistic nutritionists, osteopaths, sports medicine doctors, etc?


Mistake #7: Expecting Drastic Changes Too Quickly
If you keep piling garbage up in your garage, it’s going to take awhile to clean it all out. It really is that simple. Re-evaluate after one month and grade yourself, honestly, on your commitment, the quality and intensity of your workouts, and how you made other lifestyle changes that could drastically affect your overall goal (quality of the food you have eaten, sleep, stress loads, etc). You have to evaluate all factors that affect you from reaching your goal on a regular basis in order to keep yourself honest and on the right path.


By Phil Delarie - Sympatico MSN
jago
 
Posts: 1187

Re: The 7 Biggest Mistakes People Make in the Gym

Postby Adler » Tue Mar 15, 2011 6:39 am

Using Heavy weights in start
This is also biggest mistake people make in gym.
In making big muscles they ignore their trainer instructions and use heavy weight in start.
Adler
 
Posts: 4
Joined: Tue Mar 15, 2011 5:30 am

Re: The 7 Biggest Mistakes People Make in the Gym

Postby ippr123 » Thu Jun 09, 2011 10:29 am

Another big mistakes are talking,poor posture and poor form and not challenging yourself with progressive resistance.
ippr123
 
Posts: 3
Joined: Thu Jun 09, 2011 7:47 am

Re: The 7 Biggest Mistakes People Make in the Gym

Postby Jonson » Thu Jun 23, 2011 12:02 pm

Well,nice information shared....I really like this kind of informative post.... Please keep sharing like these useful information with us ...Keep it up...!
Jonson
 
Posts: 4
Joined: Thu Jun 23, 2011 11:46 am
Location: USA

Re: The 7 Biggest Mistakes People Make in the Gym

Postby Dexter » Tue Sep 06, 2011 6:37 pm

Hi bro,
very nice and informational sharing,
thanks for this,
this is a guide line for me,
please keep it up guys !!!!
Dexter
 
Posts: 4
Joined: Tue Sep 06, 2011 6:28 pm

Re: The 7 Biggest Mistakes People Make in the Gym

Postby angela3398 » Fri Nov 22, 2013 2:36 pm

jago wrote:Avoid these gym mistakes, and make 2009 your year to be healthier than ever.

Ok, you have done it. You have dragged yourself off the couch, and now you are looking to attack the New Year. For most people, exercising more will a top priority. I wanted to breakdown the most common mistakes I see in the gym, so you can make 2009 your year to be healthier than ever.

Mistake #1: No Goals
Business Guru Brian Tracy says “If you don’t have goals for yourself, you are doomed to work to achieve the goals of someone else.” You need to have one, and dream big. Lose 10 pounds. Complete your first 10K, half marathon or marathon. Lower your percentage of body fat to fewer than 20. You need something. Not having a goal is like sailing a ship without a rudder. You will just be pushed where the wind takes you. You need to have a direction. You need to take charge of the boat and maintain the direction you want to go, and make course corrections as you go.


Mistake #2: Too Much Cardio

Aerobic exercise is widely recognized as the ideal vehicle for fat loss. Surprisingly, this is not the case. Regularly I see people going to the treadmill, doing the same speed, the same intensity, day in and day out. Truth be told, aerobic exercise is over-hyped. Why? One reason, which might be hard to except, is monetary. Think of all the gyms around the world and how much money they spend on cardiovascular equipment. A typical commercial treadmill will cost between $10,000 - $14,000 depending upon the make. In our gym, these pieces of equipment tend to have a lifespan of 4-7 years. We have close to 50 pieces of cardiovascular equipment, so you can figure out the math. However, a set of dumbbells from 15lbs to 80lbs cost less than $5,000, and guess how long those things last? Decades! The fitness industry is a big business. Do they have an interest in ensuring that you believe walking on a treadmill or on a Stairmaster is the best way to trim down those thighs? You bet they do, and a lot of the information published supports that.


However, there is more and more evidence showing that you do not need to spend 30 plus minutes in the gym working at a low intensity on a cardio machine. Dr. Izumi Tabata is creating quite a buzz with the Medical Sports Journals on his interval based approach (more on this below). Always doing the same speed, intensity, incline, etc will give you more of the same results.


Mistake #3: Not Enough Weights
If you want results you should be including more weights into your circuit! Even bodyweight exercises such as squats, lunges, push-ups, pull-ups, are fantastic exercises that have been forgotten (and exercise companies can’t make a lot of money on them).


As I mentioned above, Dr. Izumi Tabata has come up with solid evidence that interval training (20 seconds of high intensity work, followed by 10 seconds of rest and repeated eight times) has enormous benefits for your overall strength and fat loss. Try doing the method I just mentioned using the simple bodyweight squat. Do as many as you can – with good form – in 20 seconds. Then rest for 10 seconds. Do this a total of 8 times. Follow that by 4 minutes of skipping. This is a fantastic, fat burning workout that takes less than 10 minutes, and needs no equipment.


Mistake #4: Poor Technique
The number of people I see doing exercises poorly is mind boggling. There are a number of reasons for this; the biggest reason being is that working out is work! To do things correctly, you need to put your body in an uncomfortable state of being, something the ego doesn’t like doing. The ego thinks, and will probably try and to convince you that at least you made it to the gym, that should be victory enough. Your body will naturally try and choose the easier way of doing things. It’s nice that your body wants to do that for you, and in most cases let it, just not at the gym.


Poor technique includes those people, I call them cheaters, who do an exercise and do not go through a full range of motion. They do half of a bicep curl, half a push-up, or part of a dumbbell fly. Going through a full range of motion will strengthen your muscles in the entire range. Not going through the full range only strengthen them in the limited range you work in, which leaves your muscles susceptible to injury within the ranges you do not work them in.

Another reason for the lack of full range is people are lifting way too much weight. Lower the weight and do it properly. Your muscles will benefit way more from it, and your ego will learn to deal with it.


Mistake #5: Not Hiring a Personal Trainer

Fixing #4 can be easy, hire a professional that has chosen a career in teaching others how to exercise properly and get the best bang for your time in the gym. There are different ways you can use a trainer, depending upon what your needs are. Here are three common scenarios that I see for people looking to hire a trainer:


1. The “I Need an Appointment to get me here” Client: This person likes to have a trainer 1-2x/week because they know that if they did not have a set appointment, they would not ever make it to the gym. Just knowing that they would get charged if they did not make it is reason enough to get to the gym, no matter what kind of day they thought they had.


2. The “I Need a Kick in the <beauty>” Client: This person books a train for 5-6 sessions over the course of 2-3 weeks. They want someone to kick start them into gear and know that once they see a bit of a benefit they will have the discipline to keep going on the path of wellness on their own.


3. The “I Need a Check-Up” Client: This person will commit to three or four sessions over a two week period – an assessment and goal counselling session, a run through of their program that has been written for them, and then a second run through to ensure the clients technique is proper. After a month or so, they may come back and get a new program from the trainer to mix things up.
All three of these scenarios can work – depending upon the needs you may have and knowing what has and has not worked in the past.


Mistake #6: Hiring a Poor Trainer

There are people in every line of the service industry, from construction to restaurants to personal training that do not give the service you expect. I witnessed two incidents firsthand, at two different popular gyms in Toronto, which I would like to share with you:


• I was watching a trainer working with a client. The client was overweight and could probably lose at least 70+ pounds. Over the course of about 15 minutes (assuming it was a one hour session that is ¼ of their time) they did three different calf exercises with three sets for each exercise. Calf exercises! Unless that client had some kind of strength issue in her calf that was critical perhaps to the job she performed then those were obviously the wrong exercises for her. The client needed to lose weight, and doing calf raises three different ways was not going to achieve that goal.


• I observed a trainer sitting on an exercise bench watching his client doing push-ups on the floor. He had a cup of coffee in his hand. He counted to ten, and then told his client, “Ok, do another ten, I’m just going to get another cup of coffee.”


Here are some things to consider when you meet with a trainer, or currently have one:


1. Are they in good shape themselves? All trainers don’t need to look like Arnold Schwarzenegger, but they need to have good energy levels and look fit and healthy. Do you really want to be set up with a trainer who does not listen to their own advice?
2. Do they ask you for your goals and what you are trying to achieve?
3. Do they make your workouts fresh and fun?
4. Do they genuinely care about your progress?
5. Do they provide good answers to the questions you ask?
6. Do they have a good team of professionals that they work with – holistic nutritionists, osteopaths, sports medicine doctors, etc?


Mistake #7: Expecting Drastic Changes Too Quickly
If you keep piling garbage up in your garage, it’s going to take awhile to clean it all out. It really is that simple. Re-evaluate after one month and grade yourself, honestly, on your commitment, the quality and intensity of your workouts, and how you made other lifestyle changes that could drastically affect your overall goal (quality of the food you have eaten, sleep, stress loads, etc). You have to evaluate all factors that affect you from reaching your goal on a regular basis in order to keep yourself honest and on the right path.


By Phil Delarie - Sympatico MSN


Thanks for sharing such great information. This is very helpful. I think following these tips could help me get back on track. 
angela3398
 
Posts: 12
Joined: Fri Nov 22, 2013 2:26 pm

Re: The 7 Biggest Mistakes People Make in the Gym

Postby coucouza » Fri Dec 27, 2013 6:33 pm

Great tips! thanks :)
coucouza
 
Posts: 10
Joined: Thu Jul 04, 2013 12:01 am

Re: The 7 Biggest Mistakes People Make in the Gym

Postby Kerray » Fri Feb 07, 2014 10:31 am

Hie Jago,
Great threat and thanks for sharing these 7 biggest mistakes people make in the gym and hope people will avoid these mistakes to add muscles, tone body and lose weight. Gyms are the ideal places to tone body as the atmosphere is motivational and advanced quality of gym equipment helps you to workout on all body parts.
Kerray
 
Posts: 9
Joined: Thu Feb 06, 2014 5:46 am

Re: The 7 Biggest Mistakes People Make in the Gym

Postby SteveAllen » Tue Sep 08, 2015 4:45 am

If is one of your workout goals, try these four cardio machines, which are designed to help you maximize your time exercising. But every so often, a large amount of weight comes with some strange side effects, too, says Tricia Leahey, Ph.D., professor of psychiatry at Brown University’s Warren Alpert Medical School.
SteveAllen
 
Posts: 14
Joined: Mon Feb 10, 2014 4:37 am
---------


Return to Fitness Training - Flexibility Plyometrics & MMA

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 0 guests

cron