Strength Training for Longevity

Discuss here all about strength, the science, and physiology about muscle strength and hypertrophy.

Strength Training for Longevity

Postby Canuck Singh » Sat Oct 25, 2008 10:26 am

Most average adults think that bodybuilding and pumping iron is only about oiled-up freaks posing in their swim wear. However, the average adult can expect to gain approximately 1 pound of fat every year between ages 30 to 60, and lose about a half pound of muscle over that same time span. That's a 15 pound loss of muscle and a 30 pound gain in fat!

These age-related changes in body composition have metabolic repercussions. By virtue of its mass and mitochondrial content, muscle is the largest site of lipid oxidation (fat utilization).

This means that muscle not only plays an integral role in burning fat for fuel, it also maintains healthy blood lipid profiles (lipoproteins and triglycerides) that prevent cardiovascular disease.

Weight training preserves and builds valuable muscle mass to help fight this process. Even better news comes from a recent study that showed weight training boosts mitochondrial activity in muscle cells to improve energy production.

The mitochondria in cells convert the fat, carbohydrates and protein we eat into usable energy. This research showed that weight training in older adults (over 55 years) up regulated gene activity associated with better mitochondrial function.


Training regularly with weights enables our cells’ mitochondria to produce energy more efficiently from the foods we eat.

Source: J Card Fail. 13(2):79-85, 2007.
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Re: Strength Training for Longevity

Postby Canuck Singh » Sat Oct 25, 2008 10:28 am

Sports scientists and bodybuilding experts have always assumed that high intensity exercise such as weight training had very little effect on fat metabolism.

However, a new study has recently shown that weight training increased fat metabolism from fat sites in the abdominal area.

This enhanced fat utilization effect was observed in young men and overweight men. In fact, 3 months of weight training significantly increased fat metabolism in these men.

Intense exercise such as weight training appears to stimulate better fat metabolism by boosting the activity of adrenaline receptors in fat cells.

Sometimes we get it all wrong. In a misguided attempt to shed fat, people often spend a stack of hours every week performing aerobic exercise, only to end up an exhausted and the same body fat level.

The results of this study suggest that intense exercise such as weight training can stimulate fat metabolism.

Control the diet and let the weight training do its magic, that’s the key to a lean-mean physique. Aerobic exercise can be introduced into the equation strategically, gradually, but don’t over do it.


Source: J Appl Physiol, 102, 1767-1772, 2007.
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Re: Strength Training for Longevity

Postby Canuck Singh » Sat Nov 08, 2008 3:46 pm

Virtually every person living today would benefit from weight training. Research conducted by Dr Tarone from Harvard University showed high intensity weight training benefited very frail elderly with problems like arthritis, diabetes, high blood pressure, heart disease and osteoporosis.

Miriam E. Nelson at the Human Nutrition Research Center at Tufts University in Boston demonstrated that women of all ages who trained intensely with weights built up their bones, improved the power of their muscles and their balance.

This directly benefited their recreational activities. Resistance training strengthens muscles, bones, ligaments, tendons and joints. In men and women resistance training boosts the secretion our longevity hormones such as testosterone (in men), growth hormone and IGF. In older men and women, lifting weights helps restore these hormones to more youthful levels.

Weight training increases muscle elasticity and serves to burn more fat when at rest than any other activity (this is the secret of weight control). Resistance training is also shown to benefit cardiac rehabilitation patients as the heart is a muscle that also benefits from training with weights. It becomes stronger and more efficient, reducing resting heart rate. Cosmetically, weight training is the only exercise that shapes your body. The best part is, you can determine the shape you want. For those with a limited time to exercise, no other activity comes close to providing so many health benefits.
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Re: Strength Training for Longevity

Postby David143 » Mon Aug 22, 2016 7:50 am

Train for Longevity: 4 Priorities for Mature Athletes |
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