Romanian Deadlift

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Romanian Deadlift

Postby Canuck Singh » Tue Jul 15, 2008 3:39 pm

RDLs
A lot of bodybuilders don't emphasize hamstring training in their leg workouts. Many bodybuilders stagger over to the leg curl machine and perform a few token sets after they've hammered their quads with squats, leg presses and hack squats. This research showed that the deadlift exercise was much more effective than the leg curl for recruiting the hamstring muscles.

Researchers in Greenwich, Connecticut recently tested 11 athletes to determine whether the deadlift or leg curl is more effective for strengthening the hamstrings. According to EMG activity (a measure of muscle activation), the Romanian deadlift (a variation of the stiff-legged deadlift) showed the strongest activation of the biceps femoris, the largest hamstring muscle.

One explanation for the greater activation of fibers is that the angle of the torso with respect to the legs enables more weight to be used in this lift as opposed to leg curls. Overload is the key to activating the most muscle fibers. Also, since the hamstrings are biarticular muscles (spanning two joints), they receive a greater stretch during this exercise, compared to other hamstring exercises when you bend forward.

To perform the Romanian version of the deadlift, the bar is grasped as in a normal deadlift and follows a path that runs down to just below the knees, before returning to the upright position. The movement is initiated from the hips (gluteals and hamstrings). The knee joint stays slightly bent and does not move throughout the exercise. This version of the deadlift reduces the strain typically felt in the lower back during traditional stiff-legged deadlifts and helps to prevent over stretching of tight hamstrings. By adding Romanian deadlifts to your program you will see a marked improvement in hamstring strength and leg development.

Ref: Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise 32(5): S55, 2000
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Re: Romanian Deadlift

Postby GurpreetSinghNZ » Tue Jul 15, 2008 11:18 pm

Any pictures of RDL technique?
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Re: Romanian Deadlift

Postby Canuck Singh » Wed Jul 16, 2008 8:12 am

GurpreetSinghNZ wrote:Any pictures of RDL technique?


Will be up soon ;)
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Re: Romanian Deadlift

Postby Putt_Punjabi » Wed Jul 23, 2008 6:27 pm

Is this the deadlift that where head up, chest up, normal grip on the bar, back straight,bar touching your legs while it is coming up and then down again?
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Re: Romanian Deadlift

Postby Canuck Singh » Wed Jul 23, 2008 6:42 pm

Putt_Punjabi wrote:Is this the deadlift that where head up, chest up, normal grip on the bar, back straight,bar touching your legs while it is coming up and then down again?


The Romanian Deadlift (RDL) is an awesome lift for developing strength and muscle mass in the posterior chain.
Unfortunately, the RDL is one of the most difficult lifts to learn and coach.
200841044859_RomanianDeadlift.gif

Let's work from the top down to explain proper body alignment and performance of this lift:

Head and Neck

Proper alignment of the head and neck is critical while lifting, but especially in posterior chain dominant lifts such as the RDL. The chin should be tucked slightly, and the neck in a neutral alignment with the rest of the torso.

Chest

Throughout the RDL the chest should be up and out

This is quite difficult for most, but work on keeping the chest up without extending the neck excessively.

Low Back

The low back in a resting position should have a slight lordosis. The goal throughout the RDL should be to maintain that optimal curvature; you shouldn't be increasing your arch or letting your low back round into flexion. No Flexion please!

Rounding the back is bad, but excessive arching isn't good, either

Knees

This is another area where to perform an RDL properly, you need about 15-20 degrees of knee flexion from the start. Too much knee flexion and you don't hit the hamstrings effectively. Too little and it turns into a stiff-leg deadlift where you round over and feel your lumbar discs shoot out the back side of your body!

A cue that I use with many lifters is to simply "soften" the knees at the start; this generally gets them into the appropriate position.

Feet

Your feet should be pointed straight ahead using a hip-width stance, and the weight should be shifted towards the heels.

Performance

1. Grab the bar just outside of shoulder width; if grip is an issue, feel free to use a mixed-grip or straps.
2. Set-up in a hip-width stance with the toes pointing straight ahead and weight on your heels. You should have a slight bend in the knees.
3. The chest should be up, with the chin tucked and neck in neutral alignment with the rest of the torso.
4. From the starting position, focus on pushing the hips way back. In fact, just think about pushing the hips as far back as possible while maintaining the flat back and neutral neck position.
5. Once you feel a mild stretch in the hamstrings, drive the hips forward towards the starting position. If you start to feel any rounding in the low back before this, go ahead and return at that time.
6. As you approach the starting position, focus on actively squeezing the gluteals to finish the lift.

Summary

Proper exercise technique is absolutely critical if you want to achieve success in the weight room. If you can master the RDL, arguably one of the most difficult lifts to learn
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Re: Romanian Deadlift

Postby Putt_Punjabi » Thu Jul 24, 2008 10:58 am

hm.. arent you spose to drop and repick the weight after every rep?
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Re: Romanian Deadlift

Postby GurpreetSinghNZ » Thu Aug 07, 2008 1:21 am

Canuck Singh wrote:
Putt_Punjabi wrote:Is this the deadlift that where head up, chest up, normal grip on the bar, back straight,bar touching your legs while it is coming up and then down again?


The Romanian Deadlift (RDL) is an awesome lift for developing strength and muscle mass in the posterior chain.
Unfortunately, the RDL is one of the most difficult lifts to learn and coach.
200841044859_RomanianDeadlift.gif

Let's work from the top down to explain proper body alignment and performance of this lift:

Head and Neck

Proper alignment of the head and neck is critical while lifting, but especially in posterior chain dominant lifts such as the RDL. The chin should be tucked slightly, and the neck in a neutral alignment with the rest of the torso.

Chest

Throughout the RDL the chest should be up and out

This is quite difficult for most, but work on keeping the chest up without extending the neck excessively.

Low Back

The low back in a resting position should have a slight lordosis. The goal throughout the RDL should be to maintain that optimal curvature; you shouldn't be increasing your arch or letting your low back round into flexion. No Flexion please!

Rounding the back is bad, but excessive arching isn't good, either

Knees

This is another area where to perform an RDL properly, you need about 15-20 degrees of knee flexion from the start. Too much knee flexion and you don't hit the hamstrings effectively. Too little and it turns into a stiff-leg deadlift where you round over and feel your lumbar discs shoot out the back side of your body!

A cue that I use with many lifters is to simply "soften" the knees at the start; this generally gets them into the appropriate position.

Feet

Your feet should be pointed straight ahead using a hip-width stance, and the weight should be shifted towards the heels.

Performance

1. Grab the bar just outside of shoulder width; if grip is an issue, feel free to use a mixed-grip or straps.
2. Set-up in a hip-width stance with the toes pointing straight ahead and weight on your heels. You should have a slight bend in the knees.
3. The chest should be up, with the chin tucked and neck in neutral alignment with the rest of the torso.
4. From the starting position, focus on pushing the hips way back. In fact, just think about pushing the hips as far back as possible while maintaining the flat back and neutral neck position.
5. Once you feel a mild stretch in the hamstrings, drive the hips forward towards the starting position. If you start to feel any rounding in the low back before this, go ahead and return at that time.
6. As you approach the starting position, focus on actively squeezing the gluteals to finish the lift.

Summary

Proper exercise technique is absolutely critical if you want to achieve success in the weight room. If you can master the RDL, arguably one of the most difficult lifts to learn


AWESOME post
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