Research - Overtraining & Periodization

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Research - Overtraining & Periodization

Postby Canuck Singh » Tue Jul 15, 2008 3:25 pm

Periodization
Endurance athletes often "throw" some resistance training into their programs without much thought or planning. Many athletes who desire both a strength and endurance fail to take into account the enormous impact that training for both these fitness components has on the body. A recent review indicates that athletes who are attempting to enhance both strength and aerobic power are the most likely to overtrain.

The consequences of overtraining are well documented and include prolonged poor performance and risk of illnesses such as glandular fever and chronic fatigue syndrome.

So, how can you prevent overtraining and train effectively for both? First, clearly prioritize your training goals. Be very specific about your objectives; are the strength goals muscle hypertrophy or purely neural adaptation (strength without the added mass)? Enhancing aerobic capacity can mean either maximal aerobic power or anaerobic threshold and each involves a different approach. Also, remember that your training priorities are going to change with each phase or season throughout the year.

Your training volume (weekly work load) for each fitness variable should be based on its priority. Your most important variable will require the most attention. A periodized approach is best for athletes attempting to improve more than one fitness variable. This involves segments of time where emphasis is placed on enhancing one variable, while maintaining the other. If endurance training is a priority for the first training phase of the year and training volume is high, then make sure strength training volume (but not intensity) is kept low. Once this phase is completed, assess your progress and adjust volumes and intensities for the next training phase. This structured approach is one way of maintaining the training stimulus and minimizing the amount of interference.

Adequate recovery between concurrent training sessions as well as after each training phase (macrocycle) needs to be structured into the overall program. Athletes must remember that their progress will be slower than if they concentrated purely on one variable.

Family demands, quality of nutrition, training status (age), duration and frequency, as well as the type of training performed, all need to be considered as potential factors that affect recovery and training response. Remember, if you don't plan and prepare, prepare to fail.

Ref: Sports Med 2000 Dec;30(6):385-94.
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Re: Research - Overtraining & Periodization

Postby Canuck Singh » Thu Jul 17, 2008 4:04 pm

Training twice a day?

Pervious research has shown that athletes who train twice a day run a high risk of overtraining. This research showed that training twice a day for a prolonged period of time will produce high amounts of the chemicals that cause inflammation and tear down muscle tissue.

How to prevent overtraining has always been somewhat of a mystery to sports scientists and the coaches of athletes. However, scientists from Appalachian State University now attribute overtraining to chronic whole body inflammation that is produced from training too often.

Intense exercise (weightlifting and aerobic training) causes small, micro injuries to joints, muscles and blood vessels. In response to this, the body releases “stress chemicals” to enhance the healing process. Athletes who train too long or too often and don’t give their bodies enough recovery time release high concentrations of these stress chemicals. This constant elevation in stress hormones makes it impossible for bodybuilders to recover and grow muscle from their training.

The fact is, the harder you exercise, the more recovery time you need between sessions. The more often you train, the better your nutrition must be. If you really want to see results from exercise, take the time to plan your training program. A haphazard approach to diet and exercise only leads to stagnation in results and overtraining.

Ref: Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise 32:317-331,2001.
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Re: Research - Overtraining & Periodization

Postby Canuck Singh » Thu Jul 17, 2008 4:06 pm

Adequate Recovery
Adequate recovery between intense training sessions is the key to obtaining best results from your training. Train the same body part too frequently and you are bound to short-circuit the muscle-growth process. Elite strength coaches believe one reason why bodybuilders find it hard to gain muscle at the rate they desire is because they train too often.

The old fashioned but “unfashionable” powerlifting programs provide the clearest evidence of optimal training frequency. Powerlifters train just three or four times a week and focus on only one mass building lift at each session. These super strong athletes know that progress only comes from efficient training. By concentrating on the most important lifts (such as the bench press, deadlift and squat), strength levels increase. When strength levels climb, an increase in muscle size soon follows.

The nervous system is the nerve neurons that travel down the spinal cord and branch out to the muscles. It is responsible for sending electrical impulses that power muscle contraction. A recent series of weightlifting studies has revealed that this system needs at least a full week to recover after an intense weightlifting session. A fully recovered nervous system is the key to lifting your heaviest weights. Remember, lifting your heaviest weights means new muscle growth.


The scientists behind this research suggested that it could take as long as seven or eight days for the nervous system to fully recover after intense training.

Ref: Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research. 15: 480-485,2002.
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Re: Research - Overtraining & Periodization

Postby Canuck Singh » Sat Nov 01, 2008 3:21 pm

Blood analyses have become the new vogue of sport science in the last 5-7 years in the prediction of overtraining. Indeed certain blood amino acid parameters are immerging as fair indicators. With glutamine/glutamate readings being the most consistent.
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hello

Postby UnenceToomy » Sun Nov 18, 2012 4:45 am

hello
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