Research - Optimal Sports Nutrition

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Research - Optimal Sports Nutrition

Postby Canuck Singh » Sat Jul 12, 2008 6:12 pm

Optimizing Sports Nutrition

Three of the most widely recognized sports nutrition associations-the American Dietetic Association, Dietitians of Canada, and the American College of Sports Medicine-now recognize that athletic performance and recovery from exercise are enhanced by optimal nutrition.They have outlined some strategies for athletes to follow to ensure optimal nutrition.

* Sports drinks containing an electrolyte balance (such as sodium, potassium, magnesium) and 10% carbohydrate solution, do optimize performance. They decrease time to fatigue by maintaining blood sugar levels and prevent dehydration by increasing the desire to drink. These kinds of formulations are also absorbed just as rapidly as water.

* The timing of nutritional intake after the training period is critical as it enhances recovery and accelerates training adaptations. Liquid protein and carbohydrate supplement meals are very useful for this time frame and provide additional nutrients, enhanced protein synthesis and maximal muscle glycogen replenishment.

* Ultra-low fat diets are not the best way to go. Fat intake should be adequate to provide the essential fatty acids and fat-soluble vitamins as well as to help provide adequate energy for weight maintenance. Overall, diets should provide moderate amounts of energy from fat (20% to 25% of total energy intake). For endurance athletes there appears to be no performance benefit in consuming a diet containing less than 15% of total energy from fat.

* Supplement choices need to be addressed for optimal health and exercise performance. Some athletes will need supplementation to ensure optimal performance. Athletes who restrict calorie intake or eliminate one or more food groups from their diet need to support their diets with supplements.

Ref: J Am Diet Assoc 2000 Dec;100(12):1543-56.
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Re: Research - Optimal Sports Nutrition

Postby Canuck Singh » Sun Aug 31, 2008 11:51 pm

a recent study has shown that people who restrict their caloric intake have a much lower risk of developing diabetes, heart disease and stroke. In fact, according to the conclusions made by the researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St Louis, people that followed healthy, calorie-restricted diets lowered their risk factors to levels comparable to people that are decades younger.

Although research on mice and rats has shown that stringent calorie restricted diets increase an animals’ lifespan by about 30%, this study is the first to examine the effects on humans who have been on calorie restriction diets for a long period of time.

The participants in this study restricted their calorie intake by only 10-25% while consuming a nutrient-rich diet, and they experienced a multitude of physiological health benefits including lower “bad” cholesterol levels and blood fats as well as higher concentrations of the “good” cholesterol that protects against heart disease.
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Re: Research - Optimal Sports Nutrition

Postby Canuck Singh » Sat Oct 25, 2008 8:01 pm

The timing of nutrients is key to maximizing muscle gains from intense weight lifting. Now a recent study suggests that the timing of antioxidants maybe just as crucial for protection against cell damage.

Researchers from the US Department of Agriculture (USDA) measured the blood antioxidant capacity (AOC) of subjects in a series of five clinical trials, and found that consumption of antioxidant-rich foods blunted oxidative stress that occurs after the consumption of a high-fat meal.


Millions of chemical reactions occur within our bodies every minute of every day in order to survive and function. These reactions produce free radicals. Oxidative stress (and cell damage) occurs when the production of these free radicals exceeds the body’s antioxidant capacity to quench them.

Oxidative stress is linked to fatigue, illness, poor athletic performance and premature aging.

If the consumption of antioxidants blunts oxidative stress that occurs after the consumption of a high-fat meal then the consumption of antioxidants before exercise should have the same effect.

The take-home message from this study is to keep an adequate level of antioxidants in the blood when oxidative stress is imminent. You can do this by consuming antioxidant-rich foods such as fruits and vegetables and supplementing with research-proven antioxidants
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