Research - Creatine Vol. 2: Optimising Training

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Research - Creatine Vol. 2: Optimising Training

Postby Canuck Singh » Tue Jun 24, 2008 7:47 pm

Scientists from the Department of Physiology at University of Bergen, Norway have demonstrated that creatine loading enabled sprinters to record faster times.

The study was performed as a single blind test on 18 sprinters. The participants consumed either 20 grams of creatine with 20 grams of glucose per day. Or 40 grams of glucose per day (9 sprinters in each group). The creatine loading was divided into 4 equal dosages during the day.

During the last two years a substantial part of the athlete's training had consisted of a series of maximal sprints with short rest periods to improve their fatigue resistance. The effect of creatine on sprint performance was evaluated in two tests; 1 x 100 meter sprint and 6x60 meter intermittent sprints. Creatine supplementation enabled the sprinters to significantly reduce their 100-meter sprint times from 11.68+/-0.27 seconds down to 11.59+/-0.31 seconds.

Also, the creatine supplemented sprinters reduced their total time of 6 intermittent 60 meter sprints (45.63+/-1.11 s vs. 45.12+/-1.1 seconds). Sprint velocities were significantly increased in 5 out of 6 intermittent 60 m sprints in the creatine using athletes, suggesting quicker, more efficient energy repletion and greater resistance to fatigue. No improvements were observed in the placebo group.

This is just more evidence as to the effectiveness of this powerful supplement. Creatine increases the availability of energy substrates for performing work. Athletes that do it naturally should always include creatine in their nutritional arsenal to enhance performance. However, remember results depend on your ability to absorb and assimilate the creatine. Quality and purity of the creatine supplement is essential.

Scand J Med Sci Sports. Apr;11(2):96-102, 2001
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Re: Research - Creatine Vol. 2: Optimising Training

Postby Canuck Singh » Sun Jul 06, 2008 4:55 pm

Making the weight:

Sometimes athletes have to restrict their calorie intake to "make theweight" for their sport or activity. However, restrictive dietary practices can lead to reduced performance and a loss of body protein (muscle).

Researchers at the Department of Human Nutrition, Foods, and Exercise at Virginia Tech, Blacksburg have shown that weight training athletes who supplement with creatine can still increase muscle creatine levels and improve their performance while dieting.

This investigation examined the effects of creatine supplementation in athletes on a calorie restricted diet for four days. One group of eight athletes consumed 20 grams of creatine a day for four days while the other group of eight consumed a placebo (glucose) and a controlled formula diet (with reduced calories).

Exercise performance was assessed by a series of sprints, with 30 seconds rest before and after supplementation. Nitrogen balance and body composition were also assessed in these athletes as they continued to train with weights throughout the study.

Results showed that although all the athletes lost weight, those supplementing with creatine retained more muscle. The creatine athletes also demonstrated a significantly higher muscle creatine content (15-16% more creatine in their muscles), which enabled them to perform better in the sprint tests than those athletes taking the placebo supplement.

Creatine supplementation helps build muscle during heavy weight training, however, this study showed that it can also help enhance athletic performance in times of calorie restriction. Athletes who need to make weight can still follow their normal diets to lose weight while supplementing with creatine. The creatine will still get into the muscle, help minimize muscle loss, and enhance performance.

Med Sci Sports Exerc 2001 Jan;33(1):61-8
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Re: Research - Creatine Vol. 2: Optimising Training

Postby Canuck Singh » Tue Jul 08, 2008 6:12 pm

Creatine & hormonal responses
Purpose:
This study showed that creatine does not affect the body's hormonal response from intense exercise.
Design:
Researchers in Belgium examined creatine's effect on growth hormone, testosterone, and cortisol secretion after heavy resistance training. In a double-blind cross-over study, 11-healthy young male volunteers underwent a standard heavy resistance training session after a five-day loading phase with creatine (20-grams a day) and a placebo. Blood was sampled before, immediately after, and 30 and 60-minutes after each training session.

Results showed there was no significant difference in hormonal response when the men took creatine or the sugar-based placebo. Serum growth hormone, testosterone and cortisol levels were all elevated by training and were not altered by creatine intake. It was concluded that short-term creatine supplementation does not alter hormone responses to heavy resistance training. Therefore, creatine must exert its tremendous muscle building effects via other, non-hormonal mechanisms.

Ref: Med Sci Sports Exerc. Mar 33;3:449-53 2001.
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Re: Research - Creatine Vol. 2: Optimising Training

Postby Canuck Singh » Mon Jan 05, 2009 5:33 pm

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