Glycogen Repletion

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Glycogen Repletion

Postby Canuck Singh » Mon Sep 08, 2008 9:42 pm

Glycogen is the body’s storage form of energy that fuels exercise. Low glycogen stores are associated with fatigue and poor exercise performance. Therefore, to reap the benefits of training it’s important for athletes to ensure adequate stores of glycogen in tissues. The results of one recent study demonstrated that a diet rich in whey proteins resulted in significantly higher glycogen storage in the liver during a training program.

In this study, rodents that where given whey protein stored considerably more glycogen in the liver than other rodents fed either casein or soy protein. This beneficial effect was due to whey proteins’ ability to enhance the regulatory activity of various hepatic enzymes responsible for synthesizing and storing glycogen. This study showed for the first time that the type of protein in the diet can affect liver glycogen content.

Source: Journal of Nutrition, Feb, 2005.
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Re: Glycogen Repletion

Postby Canuck Singh » Sat Sep 13, 2008 2:51 am

Muscle glycogen is the muscle’s storage form of carbohydrate and it is the most important fuel for intense weight training. Low muscle glycogen stores are related directly to poor performance in the weight room. The problem is that today, many people are carbohydrate phobic. They simply don’t eat enough carbs to fuel their workouts. Now, a recent study has revealed that performing a weight lifting workout with low muscle glycogen stores may actually stunt the anabolic (growth) response from training.

This very cool study was completed by Andrew Creer and colleagues at Ball State University. These researchers depleted muscle glycogen in one group of athletes (by feeding them a low carb diet during exercise) while another group are carb rich diet. When the researchers asked both groups to perform a leg weight lifting workout, the group with the low glycogen stores failed to activate the Akt signaling pathway in muscles. Akt, also known as protein kinase B (PKB) is an important part of the molecular signaling cascade that stimulates protein synthesis and muscle growth. Weight training with low muscle glycogen levels failed to activate this important pathway.

Bodybuilders and other strength athletes don’t need to follow a high carb diet to ensure muscle glycogen stores are at their peak, they just need to be strategic in their carb selection during the day.

Source: J Appl Physiol, 2005.
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Re: Glycogen Repletion

Postby Canuck Singh » Sun Sep 28, 2008 4:07 am

You know that awful feeling. You hit the gym focused, fully psyched to give that workout your best. But when you hit the accelerator to crank out that all-important, maximum-intensity set, it’s just not there.

The weight feels extra heavy. Instead of banging out powerful reps, every single one is a struggle, reaching your rep goal feels impossible. Before you know it you’ve reached muscle failure way too soon. Reluctantly, you let your training partner rack the bar for you, you’re beaten again.

What the heck happened? Despite all good intentions, most bodybuilders train with low muscle glycogen stores. Muscle glycogen is the primary fuel of intense exercise. Over 80% of energy (ATP) demands during weight training exercise are met by muscle glycogen. Just 3 maximum sets can deplete muscle glycogen stores by up to 40%. If you don’t replace this vital fuel with the right dietary strategies, poor performance is assured. There’s no point in slamming your foot on the accelerator if the tank is empty.


A recent study has shown that supplementation with glucose just before, during and after intense exercise preserves valuable muscle glycogen stores and boosts workout performance.

Don’t waste you’re time in the gym. Make sure your muscle fuel tank is full before you put the pedal to the metal. Take advantage of carbohydrate-rich supplements and learn how to use them to enhance performance and muscle gains, here.

Source: Int J Sports Nutr Exerc Metab, 2005.
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Re: Glycogen Repletion

Postby Canuck Singh » Wed Nov 05, 2008 7:30 pm

About 300 to 400 grams of glycogen are stored in muscle tissue and another 70 to 100 grams in the liver.

Glycogen is simply the storage form of glucose in cells. Muscle and liver hold the most.

Studies show that over time both endurance training and anaerobic (weight) training have the ability to increase resting glycogen concentrations.

Muscle glycogen is a more important source of energy during moderate to intense exercise, while liver glycogen appears to be more important during low intensity exercise. Above 60% maximal oxygen uptake, muscle glycogen is the dominant fuel source.

What type of carbohydrate is best?

Rresearch has shown that during this time frame solutions of a combination of simple polymers (short to medium chain) carbohydrates is most effective. This is a spectrum of sucrose, glucose, maltodextrins and small amounts of fructose (fruit sugar). It is unclear why this combination is optimal, but it is suspected each of these sugars is incorporated at different parts of the energy metabolism pathway.
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Re: Glycogen Repletion

Postby SinghUK » Mon May 25, 2009 4:19 pm

Reading the information you posted very helpful singh thank you. :ik:

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