Experience and training

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Experience and training

Postby Canuck Singh » Thu Sep 04, 2008 2:09 am

Some things in life get better with more experience, weight training is one of them. The latest research on hormonal response to weight training exercise has shown that experienced bodybuilders produce higher levels of anabolic hormones compared to novice lifters. However, these benefits come at a cost.

A ground-breaking series of studies completed at Connecticut University has shown that experience improves the anabolic response from lifting. In this study, experienced lifters consistently achieved higher levels of circulating anabolic hormones after weight lifting exercise compared to beginners. Growth hormone, bound-testosterone and free-testosterone concentrations were higher in the men that had been training for a number of years compared to novices. However, the experienced weight lifters also showed a higher concentration of cortisol (a catabolic hormone) after a workout.

High cortisol levels increase muscle protein breakdown. A recent study has shown that high cortisol levels in the blood also increase the production of myostatin; a compound that reduces muscle mass. However, there is an easy way to counteract this process and amplify the muscle building response triggered by by each workout. Post-workout cortisol production can be minimized dramatically by restoring blood glucose and insulin levels immediately after a workout.

Source: Canadian Journal of Applied Physiology, 29, 2004.
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Re: Experience and training

Postby Canuck Singh » Sat Oct 25, 2008 8:09 pm

Most dedicated athletes such as bodybuilders totally freak out if they have to miss a week or two of training for whatever reason. However, a recent study has shown that reductions in strength and power are rather minimal when dedicated lifters have up to a month away from pumping iron.

A recent study has shown that when a group of strength athletes stopped training for 4 weeks they only experienced an average decrease in strength of around 6 to 9%. They showed a slightly greater reduction in power (the ability to exert force rapidly).

This research also showed that a two week reduction in training volume (reduction in the number of workouts completed) actually increased strength and muscle IGF levels.

Therefore, sometimes a short layoff or a reduction in weekly training volume isn’t a bad thing, particularly for dedicated athletes. Strength and power decreases after a short lay off are very minimal.

Source: J Strength and Conditioning Res, 21, 768, 2007.
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Re: Experience and training

Postby Canuck Singh » Sat Nov 01, 2008 10:46 am

Did you know, gut cells (the lining of you stomach) live only a few hours, but bone cells last a few years!

Muscle biopsy studies show some muscle fibers heal quicker than others eg the oxidative, slow-twitch (aerobic) type have the better blood supply so they tend to recover faster.

Studies on runners show that their quads can take up to 21 days for full tissue remodeling to occur after a race. That's every fiber completely healed and adapted. And that's only from running!

Muscle biopsies taken on weight training subjects reveal these facts:

* Novice trainers create enormous fiber damage from their initial weight sessions. Even after 21 days some damage is still seen in the muscles of these people. The longer you have been training the harder it is to create the necessary damage needed to produce growth. Muscle fibers actually toughen up! That's why increasing poundage when you train is so important and so is introducing slight variations in the angles you use in your exercises. Smaller body parts are shown to recover quicker (forearms and calves) and no one knows why.

* Most successful natural lifters tend to hit each muscle group hard once per week. I think it is a good time frame, although little research has examined this.

Remember, when damage is produced it is not the same amount of damage across the entire range of fibers. The real fast twitch (the ones that grow the biggest) are only damaged under maximal loads, especially heavy eccentric movements. Some peoples’ workout's don’t even recruit these fibers let alone damage them! Slow-twitch (aerobic ) fibers are also shown to produce a wide range of growth. Ever taken a look at a good road cyclists' legs?

So in general, for the larger groups hit em' real hard and heavy then given plenty of time to recover. You can train your calves and forearms a bit more often, but make sure they are recovering fully between workouts.
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Re: Experience and training

Postby hsingh » Wed Jan 07, 2009 11:34 pm

Canuck Singh wrote:High cortisol levels increase muscle protein breakdown. A recent study has shown that high cortisol levels in the blood also increase the production of myostatin; a compound that reduces muscle mass. However, there is an easy way to counteract this process and amplify the muscle building response triggered by by each workout. Post-workout cortisol production can be minimized dramatically by restoring blood glucose and insulin levels immediately after a workout.
Does that mean that one should eat a little bit of sweet things immediately after their workout? Like honey, pineapple juice. I don't think plain sugar would be good ...
From what I know, sweet foods increase insulin levels.
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Re: Experience and training

Postby Canuck Singh » Thu Jan 08, 2009 9:26 am

hsingh wrote:
Canuck Singh wrote:High cortisol levels increase muscle protein breakdown. A recent study has shown that high cortisol levels in the blood also increase the production of myostatin; a compound that reduces muscle mass. However, there is an easy way to counteract this process and amplify the muscle building response triggered by by each workout. Post-workout cortisol production can be minimized dramatically by restoring blood glucose and insulin levels immediately after a workout.
Does that mean that one should eat a little bit of sweet things immediately after their workout? Like honey, pineapple juice. I don't think plain sugar would be good ...
From what I know, sweet foods increase insulin levels.

Indeed, some sugary drink after training is a great idea. Something like a juice, or as you mentioned honey:

viewtopic.php?f=9&t=43&p=63&hilit=honey#p63

After a workout, carbohydrates stimulate insulin which acts to prevent muscle breakdown,

while also going straight into muscle for uptake.

Note: INsulin resistance is more related to obesity than to those who train
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Re: Experience and training

Postby Aiden Hooley » Mon Aug 01, 2016 11:59 am

Thanks for sharing it with us.
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