Exercise and Bone Health

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Exercise and Bone Health

Postby Canuck Singh » Sat Sep 13, 2008 2:53 am

Recent studies now confirm that high overload weight training Max-OT style, stimulates the synthesis of both contractile and non contractile proteins in muscle. However for the optimal transfer of force from muscle cells to bone, the connective tissue such as tendons needs to be strong. Particularly the protein that makes up tendons called collagen needs to be in tip-top shape. The problem is that up until now, scientists didn’t know if exercise stimulated the regeneration of connective tissue proteins such as muscle collagen.

To examine the effect of exercise on muscle tissue proteins, healthy volunteers, performed a series of leg extensions. After the workout, the scientists infused labeled amino acids into the participant’s blood stream. The incorporation of the amino acids into muscle (contractile, non contractile protein) and collagen protein were assessed via biopsies and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

Results revealed that the fractional synthetic rates of all proteins were elevated at the 6 hour post exercise mark but rose rapidly to peak at 24 hours after exercise. There was a rapid increase in both muscle protein collagen synthesis after strenuous exercise. Therefore, weight training probably contributes to the health and strength of tendons. Also, the similar time course of changes of protein synthetic rates of the different cell types supports the idea of a highly coordinated recovery-adaptive response.

Source: The journal of Physiology, 2005.
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Re: Exercise and Bone Health

Postby Alex11 » Mon Mar 28, 2011 9:53 am

Great information dear great forum i really like it. Please tell me about the back bone problem because my brother has a problem of backbone so please help me about this what should he do for this pain.
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Re: Exercise and Bone Health

Postby ippr123 » Thu Jun 09, 2011 10:00 am

1)Stretching the muscles and body with the back that will really helps to remove injury.
2)Lie on your back and bend your knees and put both hands besides your body .slowly raise your lower back ,so that it does not touch the ground.
3)Sit down with your knees bended and raise your arms and slowly lower your back until your head touch your floor.
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Re: Exercise and Bone Health

Postby angela3398 » Fri Nov 22, 2013 2:59 pm

Canuck Singh wrote:Recent studies now confirm that high overload weight training Max-OT style, stimulates the synthesis of both contractile and non contractile proteins in muscle. However for the optimal transfer of force from muscle cells to bone, the connective tissue such as tendons needs to be strong. Particularly the protein that makes up tendons called collagen needs to be in tip-top shape. The problem is that up until now, scientists didn’t know if exercise stimulated the regeneration of connective tissue proteins such as muscle collagen.

To examine the effect of exercise on muscle tissue proteins, healthy volunteers, performed a series of leg extensions. After the workout, the scientists infused labeled amino acids into the participant’s blood stream. The incorporation of the amino acids into muscle (contractile, non contractile protein) and collagen protein were assessed via biopsies and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

Results revealed that the fractional synthetic rates of all proteins were elevated at the 6 hour post exercise mark but rose rapidly to peak at 24 hours after exercise. There was a rapid increase in both muscle protein collagen synthesis after strenuous exercise. Therefore, weight training probably contributes to the health and strength of tendons. Also, the similar time course of changes of protein synthetic rates of the different cell types supports the idea of a highly coordinated recovery-adaptive response.

Source: The journal of Physiology, 2005.



Thanks for sharing such great information.It increases my knowledge ans is very helpful for me.
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