Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness (DOMS)

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Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness (DOMS)

Postby Canuck Singh » Wed Jul 23, 2008 5:13 pm

Sports scientists believe that delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS) is caused by acute inflammation.
Researchers at Democritus University of Thrace in Komotini, Greece decided to study the effects of small doses of ibuprofen on delayed-muscle soreness to see if this may help speed muscle recovery after eccentric exercise.

Nineteen subjects participated in this double blind study. To induce DOMS the subjects performed eccentric leg curls (6 sets of 10 repetitions at 100% 1 repetition max). Nine subjects took 400 milligrams of ibuprofen once every eight hours for the first 48 hours. The control group took a placebo pill during the same time frame.

Muscle soreness (assessed through questionnaire) increased at 24 and 48 hours in both groups. However the ibuprofen group rated the soreness as significantly less at both time periods. Maximal strength, range of motion, and vertical jump performance decreased in both groups at all measured times (4 - 6, 24, and 46 hours after exercise). These decreases are a clear sign that muscles is not fully recovered.

White blood cell count (a sign of inflammation) and creatine kinase (a marker of muscle damage) were measured at 4 - 6, 24, and 48 hours. White blood cell count significantly increased in both groups 4 - 6 hours after exercise. Creatine kinase levels were increased in both groups after 24 and 48 hours, but were significantly lower in the ibuprofen group after 48 hours. The bottom line is that take Ibuprofen under these assessment conditions did not speed muscle recovery.

This research did not examine Ibuprofen’s effect on protein synthesis rates, so we don’t know what affect consuming this small dose may have on muscle growth. Results of this study suggest that ibuprofen may decrease perception of soreness induced by eccentric actions, but will not help speed muscle recovery or restore muscle function.

Ref: Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research 17:53-59, 2003
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Re: Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness (DOMS)

Postby Canuck Singh » Sat Oct 04, 2008 11:00 pm

Cyclooxygenase (COX) activity and its downstream prostaglandins are involved in the muscle growth response to weight training. Prostaglandins are potent modulators of pain and inflammation in muscle tissue. A recent study has shown that the anti-inflammatory drug Ibuprofen inhibits COX activity and the muscle growth response to overload.

However, this new study directly assessed muscle growth in response to overload within and without the effects of Ibuprofen. It also provided a clear mechanistic explanation for the impaired growth response from this drug.

Therefore, although drugs such as Ibuprofen may help reduce pain and inflammation after injury, it seems clear that they also interfere with skeletal muscle adaptations to resistance exercise. Use Ibuprofen sparingly.

Source: Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise 38(5); 840-846, 2006.

The bottom line: Do not take ibuprofen on your workout days - at all!
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Re: Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness (DOMS)

Postby Canuck Singh » Thu Oct 16, 2008 8:01 pm

deep muscle pain that usually occurs within 24 hours after a workout. It’s often worse 48 hours after exercise. This type of soreness is known as delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS).

While scientists aren’t completely sure how DOMS occurs but it’s associated with structural damage of muscle fibers due to high-overload, intense muscle contractions. The fast-twitch muscle fibers, (the fibers most responsive to growth) wear most of the damage from this type of training and they can take up to seven days to fully repair.

Researchers from the University of Georgia have found that caffeine supplementation was able to reduce muscle soreness following muscle contraction via electrical stimulation
. The participants in this study were given a 5 milligram per kilogram of body weight dose after a workout. The researchers speculate that caffeine blocks the activity of a chemical called adenosine which is released during the inflammatory response to muscle injury. this study used untrained participants, we don’t know if the same response is obtained in resistance-trained individuals.


Source: Medicine & Science in Sports Exercise, 2007
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