Chocolate

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Chocolate

Postby Canuck Singh » Fri Aug 29, 2008 5:56 am

An interesting study completed by Australian researchers has shown that chocolate-containing snacks cause a tremendous insulin spike. Foods that contained chocolate produced a 28% higher increase in insulin than the same foods that didn’t contain chocolate.

The researchers in this study measured blood sugar and insulin responses after the consumption of six pairs of the same food; one contained chocolate and the other did not. The foods included candy bars, cakes, ice cream and breakfast cereals. While blood sugar readings were similar for both chocolate and non chocolate-flavored foods, the product containing chocolate always produced a higher insulin response in the blood stream after consumption.

The higher insulin response could be due to specific amino acids contained within the cocoa but scientists aren’t sure.

Journal of Nutrition 133:3149-3152, 2003.
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Re: Chocolate

Postby Canuck Singh » Sun Oct 26, 2008 10:28 am

Chocoholics rejoice. However, they probably would have liked this research to stipulate a larger serve. Nevertheless, a recent study has revealed that 6.7 grams of dark chocolate per day is the ideal amount for a protective effect against cardiovascular disease.

This research was completed at the Research Laboratories of the Catholic University in Campbasso and the National Cancer Institute of Milan, it was one of the largest epidemiological studies ever conducted in Europe.

The preventative benefit of dark chocolate resides in its anti-inflammatory phytochemicals that reduce inflammation in artery walls and reduce the build up of disease causing plaque.

Just remember, any type of chocolate packs a heavy caloric punch. Although a 6 or 7 gram serving a day of dark chocolate is very small and only provides 2 grams of fat, I don’t know if many chocoholics could stop at this measly serving . Enjoy, but be aware
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Re: Chocolate

Postby Canuck Singh » Sat Nov 08, 2008 3:48 pm

Did you know that chocolate is the most widely written about food in history? And, there is a chocolate you can eat that is good for you and will not disrupt your fat loss! Chocolate in its raw, unsweetened state is quite bitter and Christopher Columbus discovered it in his journey to the Caribbean in 1502. An Aztec chief of an island where he made a short stop offered this strange drink to him. Columbus and his crew found the brew quite repulsive! It was not until Cortes discovered Mexico in 1519 that Europeans really acquired a taste for chocolate, especially when they discovered the bitter taste could be lessened with sugar, vanilla and cinnamon. Chocolate was prescribed as an antidote to exhaustion and muscle weakness. In its uncommercialized state chocolate does have a high magnesium and phosphorus content.

In his excellent book "Dine Out and Lose Weight" (published in 1987 by Editions Artulen) Michel Montignac, a Frenchman, describes how a chocolate with a 70% cocoa content does not create the traditional blood sugar and insulin surge that conventional candy and chocolate does. Gram for gram this type of chocolate has less than half the sugar, fat and calorie content of conventional chocolate and all the nutrients of the raw material.

However to eat it in copious amounts and expect no detrimental impact to your fat loss goals is an unrealistic and silly expectation. However, in terms of an occasional indulgence it is an excellent choice. Montignac's work was far ahead of its time. A business man with no medical or science background, Montignac in his desperation to maintain a suitable weight, self-taught and researched the physiological aspects of weight gain in relation to our modern day diets. He was one of the pioneers of the diet high in protein and good fats and low in refined carbohydrates like breads and pasta. Absolutely revolutionary, radical concepts to the medical community at the time. Much of his information on carbohydrates, insulin and glyciemic index of foods is only just now being verified and grudgingly acknowledged by the most anally retentive nutritionists.

The "good" chocolate is widely available, even most supermarkets carry it. If it is not called 70% cocoa, be sure to read the ingredients label. It must stipulate 70% or more cocoa content to be suitable. Enjoy
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Re: Chocolate

Postby Alexbit » Mon Nov 21, 2011 10:51 am

Hello dude the all variations of chocolate is better for the health.Chocolate is just too good and banana with dates shake is also my favorite one.Milk and chocolate makes best and delicious combination,.

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