Children's Nutrition

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Children's Nutrition

Postby Canuck Singh » Wed Jul 23, 2008 4:54 pm

A study published last month in The International Journal of Obesity (27:416-418, 2003) revealed that although overweight children consume high calorie diets, many are still deficient in key nutrients such as iron. Also, many of these deficiencies can be contributed to poor dietary habits.

The study sample included 321 Israeli children and adolescents examined between 1999 and 2001. The subjects were divided into three groups on the basis of body mass index (BMI) for age and gender. Iron-deficiency anemia (IDA), is a chronic shortage of iron in the blood that retards proper growth and function. A child diagnosed with IDA was defined as hemoglobin level below 2 standard deviation scores (SDS) for the mean for age and gender.

Dangerously low blood iron levels were revealed in 38.8% of all obese children studied compared with only 4.4% of children in the normal-weight group. Statistically, this revealed a highly significance difference (P<0.001) between these two groups of children regarding iron deficiency. Most alarmingly, among the iron deficient children, 26% were diagnosed with IDA.

Iron deficiency maybe common in overweight and obese children. These assessments were performed on Israeli children; their diets generally contain much less junk food than westernized kids. I suspect if this research had been performed on US kids the results would have been worse.

Kids only mimic the actions of the adults around them. If the adults in children’s lives have bad nutrition habits, the children will follow. If children consistently see their elders choosing healthy foods, eventually they will too.
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Re: Children's Nutrition

Postby Canuck Singh » Sat Oct 25, 2008 8:40 pm

Do the foods our kids eat affect their performance and behavior in school? Scientific research definitely says yes.

The glycemic index (GI) is a measurement of a foods’ ability to raise blood glucose levels. However, the GI doesn’t take into account the amount of food consumed, this also affects blood glucose levels and insulin responses.

Glycemic load is a more recent term developed, it takes into account the serving size of the food and the effect this has on blood glucose levels.

Many parents give their kids a big bowl of processed cereal for breakfast, however most commercial cereals not only have a high GI they provide a high glycemic load on the system and this doesn’t do kids any good in terms of performance in the class room.

In a recent study, the impact of different glycemic load breakfasts on the performance of children in the class room was explored.

Over a four week period, the children (aged 7-8 years old) attended a school breakfast club each morning and ate one of three meals. Each meal offered a similar amount of energy but differed in their glycemic load.

Consumption of a low glycemic load breakfast resulted in better performance in memory tests and the ability to sustain attention. Plus, fewer signs of frustration were displayed and initially more time was spent on the task when working individually in class.

This research underlines the link between nutrition and learning capacity. For children, the correct breakfast will boost intellect and promote better concentration to help them get the most from school. And remember, if your child learns how to learn at school, they’ll do well at anything they choose to do in life.

Source: Physiol Behav. 717-24, 2007.
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Re: Children's Nutrition

Postby Carter » Fri Apr 05, 2013 9:40 am

Alarmingly low blood metal levels were exposed in 38.8% of all overweight kids analyzed in contrast to only 4.4% of kids in the normal weight team, In past statistics, this exposed a highly importance difference....
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Re: Children's Nutrition

Postby bugatti » Mon Apr 21, 2014 10:28 pm

adults must be carful about the childrens food
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