Calcium

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Calcium

Postby Canuck Singh » Mon Jul 21, 2008 6:38 pm

A large amount of evidence now supports a relationship between increased calcium intakes and reductions in body weight, specifically fat mass.

The first observations in rats over 10 years ago on through to several recently published clinical studies support this “fat-reduction” relationship. The impact of calcium intake on weight loss or prevention of weight gain has been demonstrated in a wide age range of Caucasian and African-Americans of both genders. A review this year focused on the results of several clinical trials that have investigated the impact of calcium and dairy products on prevention of weight gain, weight loss or development of the insulin resistance syndrome. The conclusions are that calcium plays a substantial contributing role in reducing body weight, particularly fat mass and prevalence of the insulin resistance.

Even more interesting are the findings that dietary calcium also plays a pivotal role in the regulation of energy metabolism. Some researchers have shown that high calcium diets help prevent fat accumulation, increase lipolysis (fat metabolism in fat cells) and preserve thermogenesis during caloric restriction. All these factors accelerate the fat loss process.

The best way to increase your calcium intake, and get lean and stay lean, is by eating low fat dairy foods and green vegetables.

Ref: J. Nutr. 2003 133: 245-248.
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Re: Calcium

Postby Canuck Singh » Wed Aug 13, 2008 5:18 am

many reasons, scientists and the general public are becoming increasingly aware of the importance of dietary calcium. Many research studies demonstrate a link between dietary calcium intake and improved body composition as well as diseases such as osteoporosis, arterial hypertension and colon cancer. These diseases have many causes, but the scientific community now recognizes that dietary calcium helps prevent them.

State of the art assessment methods now reveal that the bioavailability of calcium in a food is most important to obtaining this mineral’s health benefits. Bioavailability depends on the likelihood of the calcium to be absorbed and incorporated into bone. In a detailed report that compared research on the bioavailability of difference sources of calcium, dairy foods won hands down.

To obtain calcium’s beneficial effects, this element must be retained by the body and used in bone formation and mineralization. Some compounds in food can form insoluble complexes with calcium, thereby reducing its absorbability of the diet, these include; phytates found in bran and most cereals and seeds, oxalates in spinach, rhubarb, walnuts and sorrel, and tannins (found in tea).

A diet rich in dairy foods seems to be the only way to ensure a large portion of your calcium intake is retained and utilized by the body. People that follow strict vegetarian diets are most at risk of developing calcium deficiencies. Another important finding is that most fibers (cellulose, hemicelluloses, lignins and non-cellulose polysaccharides) seem to have no direct effect on calcium absorbability.

J Am Coll Nutr 2000 19: 119S-136
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Re: Calcium

Postby Canuck Singh » Tue Aug 19, 2008 4:57 am

The latest research on calcium is very exciting to bodybuilders and other that want to keep their bodies lean. A high intake of calcium appears to enhance the body’s capacity to burn fat for energy and reduce body fat levels.

Scientists at the University of Colorado have shown that people who consume a high calcium intake can mobilize stored fat and use it for energy much easier that people on a low calcium intake.

The only way to get rid of body fat is to mobilize it from fat cells so other cells (such as muscles) can burn it for energy. This research showed that a high calcium intake helps the body mobilize fat from fat cells and use it for fuel.

Another important way scientists believe calcium is critical for fat breakdown is its ability to switch-on chemicals called “uncoupling proteins” (located in the mitochondria of muscle cells). By activating “uncoupling proteins” will ensure that excess calories are burnt as heat, rather than stored as fat. Low fat dairy products such as milk, yogurt, cottage cheese and protein supplements are rich sources of calcium.

Int Journal of Obesity 27:196-203, 2003.
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Re: Calcium

Postby Canuck Singh » Thu Aug 21, 2008 5:55 am

An ever increasing amount of evidence now supports a relationship between high calcium intake and low body fat levels. A high calcium intake is important to bodybuilders and bodyshapers as it appears help the body burn a greater amount of fat.

Calcium is one of several minerals that are essential to building strong bones. A recent review of the research shows that plain ol’ cow’s milk may prove to be the best (and most cost effective) calcium supplement available.

This study was published in the June 2003 issue of the Journal of the American College of Nutrition, and it highlighted the importance of taking calcium with other minerals such as phosphorus to ensure calcium’s beneficial effects.

Increasing calcium intake without a corresponding increase in phosphorus intake decreases the amount of calcium absorbed by the body. Dairy milk is not only one of the richest sources of calcium, but also a major source of phosphorus and all other minerals that enable calcium to exert its beneficial effects on the metabolism. Therefore, milk maybe the ideal calcium “supplement”.

The researchers recommended that the ratio of calcium to phosphorus is very important to ensure bone health and it’s important to get enough of both minerals. The easiest (and cheapest) way to do this is drink your milk!
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Re: Calcium

Postby Canuck Singh » Fri Sep 05, 2008 7:25 pm

Adding low-fat yogurt to a calorie-controlled diet had a marked effect on fat loss, according to a study published in the April issue of the International Journal of Obesity, (vol 29, pp391-397).

The results of this study showed that overweight people lost at least 22% more unwanted weight (body fat) if they added three serves of low-fat yoghurt to their daily diet. These results support previous findings that link the consumption of dairy proteins to better weight loss. It is thought that the calcium in dairy foods plays a role in preventing body fat accumulation but the mechanism for this effect is still not clear.

In this study completed by Dr. Michael Zemel from the University of Tennessee, all the participants reduced their usual daily calorie intake by 500 calories. One group consumed 400-500mgs of calcium per day while the other group upped their intake to 1100mgs a day via three servings of low-fat yogurt each day. The group that consumed more calcium lost the most body fat.
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Re: Calcium

Postby Canuck Singh » Mon Sep 08, 2008 9:49 pm

For athletes, an adequate supply of calcium for optimum performance is vital. Calcium is not only essential to bone maintenance it is indispensable to nerve conduction, muscle contraction and a myriad of other physiological functions. Calcium also appears to have a key role in fat loss; low calcium intake retards your ability to burn fat for fuel. Everyday that calcium intake is inadequate, the body draws upon its own reserves within bone, to meet these demands.

Recent reports show that the average intake of calcium in U.S. citizens is only approx 750mg/day; way below the recommended intake of 1200mg. Athletes maybe even more deficient because bone mineralization increases in response to the stress of exercise. Additionally, accurate assessment of calcium status is difficult as blood calcium concentrations are maintained within a tightly controlled, physiological range so that normal values are preserved even when intake is poor. Therefore, athletes should be aware of the best nutritional sources of calcium.

Dairy protein-based products can contain between 500-2000mg of dairy calcium (per 100grams of protein). Dairy calcium is the most bioavailable form of calcium. The bioavailability of a nutrient in a particular food is the actual amount of the nutrient that is absorbed during digestion. Studies have shown that calcium absorption from non-dairy sources, such as fortified soy milk are 25% less than that seen from dairy foods. Therefore, whey protein-based products are a cost-effective, high quality source of calcium that is readily absorbed by the body.

Source: Annual Review of Nutrtion 24: 413, 2004.
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Re: Calcium

Postby Canuck Singh » Mon Sep 08, 2008 9:57 pm

Calcium has emerged as a key micronutrient for health-conscious people. A high calcium intake promotes better fat metabolism and a lean physique. Some health professionals suggest that all calcium-containing foods are absorbed equally as effectively within the body. However, a recent study suggests that this is not true.

This study examined urinary calcium excretion after drinking milk or calcium-rich mineral water over 12 weeks. Both drinks contained the same amount of calcium intake. The results showed that the urinary excretion of calcium of the 37 participants was significantly higher (0.5 mmol/day more) with water than with milk. Therefore, despite an equal calcium intake and assuming an unchanged intestinal absorption, these results suggest that calcium balance is better with dairy based drinks than with calcium sulfate-rich water. The bottom line is to choose dairy based foods as your source of calcium.

Source: British J Nutr, 93: 225-231, 2005.
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Re: Calcium

Postby Canuck Singh » Sat Oct 04, 2008 11:13 pm

As long as you’re following a calorie-controlled eating plan, a recent study has shown that a calcium-rich breakfast should promote better fat loss.

This Australian study of overweight adults compared the acute effects of high versus low-calcium breakfasts on fat oxidation (burning) after a meal. Fat oxidation is typically suppressed after a meal. However, fat oxidation was suppressed significantly less (up to 44%) by the high calcium meals, when compared to the low calcium meal.

This research follows other studies that show a high intake of dairy calcium but not calcium supplements, promote a higher rate of fat utilization and better fat loss. A high intake of dairy calcium during a calorie-controlled eating plan will ensure better fat loss over the long term. Learn how to boost the calcium levels of your eating plan without adding unnecessary calories, here.

Source: British Journal of Nutrition, 96: 138-144, 2006.
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Re: Calcium

Postby Canuck Singh » Thu Oct 09, 2008 4:07 am

Utilizing a large group of healthy people, this study examined whether a high calcium intake from dairy products or calcium supplements can affect appetite and fat metabolism after a meal.

Results showed that compared to a calcium supplement (calcium carbonate), the calcium from dairy foods such as skim milk and low-fat yogurt was more effective in lowering the amount of fat released into the bloodstream after a high-fat meal. Somehow the dairy calcium foods reduced fat absorption.

The scientists weren’t sure why dairy had a beneficial effect compared to the calcium supplement. However, it appears as though the source of calcium and/or the combination of other naturally occurring components contained in the dairy food work together to lower the amount of fat released into the bloodstream. This fat-lowering effect was obtained from consuming whole foods. Therefore, a high intake of low fat dairy foods is a simple strategy that can help people get lean and stay lean.

Increased calcium intake from dairy-based products appears to reduce fat absorption after a meal. These findings may be just another reason why a high intake of dairy-based products promotes better fat loss. Learn more about this phenomenon here.

Source: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 85:678–87, 2007.
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Re: Calcium

Postby Canuck Singh » Sat Oct 25, 2008 8:49 pm

A diet that deficient in calcium triggers a series of biochemical events that favor fat storage, particularly in the waistline area.

The body has a real difficulty mobilizing and oxidizing (utilizing) fat for fuel. Conversely, a high intake of dairy calcium directly increases the body’s metabolic rate and the ability to mobilize and utilize fat. These findings have been reported both in animal studies and clinical trials with healthy people.

In fact, the finding that calcium supplementation stimulates fat burning has been demonstrated in 4 of 5 recent studies. The amount of calcium required to produce this effect appears to be in the vicinity of 1,400 milligrams/day.

Increasing your intake of calcium is definitely a smart move if you’re after more efficient fat loss when dieting. Learn the most efficient and effective ways to boost your intake of dairy calcium click here.

Source: Obesity, advance online, April, 2008.
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Re: Calcium

Postby Canuck Singh » Sun Nov 02, 2008 1:52 pm

Nutritional science clearly demonstrates that to use calcium your body must have at least adequate supplies of phosphorous, magnesium, manganese, silicon, zinc, copper and fluoride. Maximum bone mass and bone strength is achieved between the ages of 18 and 35.2 So you have to start making "deposits" now as this store carries you throughout the rest of your life.

The RDA for calcium is 1200mg while the average intake in the US is around 750mg/day.1 Two out of every three women in this age group do not get enough calcium.2 Not good. Calcium is a macro mineral that we need a lot of every day. About 99% or your body"s calcium is stored in your bones. The other 1% flows throughout your body controlling conduction of nerve impulses that are essential to a matrix of vital processes.

While we know that the best sources of calcium are dairy foods and leafy greens, optimal amounts are difficult to absorb. The phytates in grains (cereals and breads) bind with calcium to inhibit absorbtion.1So do the oxalates in spinach, coffee, cocoa and chocolate.1 So giving children chocolate milk for their calcium intake is dumb.

Most people that workout will be doubly deficient in calcium as bone mineralization increases tremendously in response to the stress of exercise.3 The high protein diets of bodybuilders is also shown to cause negative calcium balance.4 The amenorrhea (loss of periods) that many female athletes experience is a concern because this hormone imbalance allows large amounts of calcium and other minerals to be excreted, with bone stores having to constantly meet demands.5 To increase the density of your bones you must increase calcium intake, along with other minerals.

Another reason many calcium supplements do not work is the type of calcium that is incorporated. In terms of supplementation you have to be very selective. For example if a label says 1000mg of calcium gluconate per tablet you would probably think this is a hefty dose of calcium. Not so, calcium gluconate is only 9% elemental calcium.6 Therefore only 90mgs of calcium are available for absorption, along way from the 1200mg RDA. The more you educate yourself the better. The label needs only to refer to the source of calcium, not the amount available to the body. If you look at other sources used in commercial calcium supplements, most are not much better. Calcium acetate provides 23% elemental calcium, calcium citrate provides 21% calcium and calcium lactate provides 14%.6 For the record milk is 1% calcium. 6 Calcium carbonate is by far the best source, providing just over 40% elemental calcium. 6 However, this is the amount presented to the body. Not the amount absorbed by the body. 6 Studies show that a mere 32% of the elemental calcium in calcium acetate is absorbed. 6 Only 30% of the calcium in calcium citrate is absorbed and a respectable 27% of the calcium in milk is absorbed. 6 Once again calcium carbonate comes up trumps with 39% of all elemental calcium being absorbed. 6 So if we crunch the numbers, we"ll see that a calcium supplement containing 1000mgs of calcium carbonate (the better source) provides 400mgs of elemental calcium. 39% of that 400mgs is absorbed, that"s only 156mgs. Now you understand how so many women do not get enough calcium.

You must provide your body with a reason to hang on to its calcium stores. Bone is incredible stuff. It is structurally stronger than any steel, yet 10 times lighter. It is very dynamic; unless you constantly stress it, it disintegrates. Specifically, the areas that you "load" are the only areas that strengthen and thicken. Also, bone molecules only grow in alignment directly against the stress placed upon it. Therefore its strength is specific to angle or direction. The area that most women develop bone degeneration (osteoporosis) is across the cervical and upper thoracic vertebrae (the upper back, neck and shoulders). Over many years this develops into that terrible "Hump Back" condition that is commonly seen in many older men and women. Based on these facts most doctors recommend walking as the exercise to ward off this disease (go figure that one?). However resistance training is far more effective activity. A variety of exercises can be utilized that stress (load) every joint in the skeletal structure in a multitude of angles.

1. Recommended Dietary Allowances 10TH Ed. National Academy Press,1989.
2. Avioli LV. Calcium and Osteoporosis. Am. Rev. Nutr.4:471,1984.
3. Lane NE,et al. Long distance running, bone density and osteoporosis. J. Am. Med. Assoc.225:1147,1986
4. Hegsted M, et al. Urinary calcium and calcium balance in young men affected by level of protein and phosphorous intake. J.Nutr.111:553-555.1981
5. Linnel SL, et al. Bone mineral content and menstrual regularity in female runners. Med Sci. Sports Exer.16:342-345.1984.
6. Sibtain M. Gastrointestinal absorption of calcium from milk and calcium salts.N. Eng. J. Med. 317:532-535, 1987
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Re: Calcium

Postby Canuck Singh » Wed May 20, 2009 2:31 am

Research now reveals that a high calcium intake may become the bodybuilder’s secret weapon that helps achieve a lean, mean physique. Scientific evidence now shows that a high calcium intake not only offers real protection against body fat accumulation, it enables a person to utilize (burn) more fat for energy.

Researchers from the University of Colorado have found that people who consume high amounts of calcium in their diet possess a greater ability to mobilize fat from fat cells and use this fuel for energy. Interestingly, at the other end of the scale, a low calcium diet appears to promote fat storage.

A high calcium intake appears to stimulate “uncoupling proteins” in the mitochondria of muscle cells. Stimulating these proteins diverts calories toward heat production rather than store them as fat. In mice, low calcium diets are shown to promote lipid (fat) storage, whereas a high calcium intake was shown to inhibit fat accumulation and accelerate fat utilization.

In terms of applicable research, analysis of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES III) has revealed a clear relationship between people who consume a high intake of calcium and people with low levels of body fat. Basically, this extensive dietary survey revealed that the higher the calcium intake of the individual, the leaner they were. This cross-sectional survey was conducted over a 6-year period (between 1988 and 1994) and it followed a complex, four-stage probability sampling scheme designed to represent the entire U.S. civilian non-institutionalized population.

The amount of calcium in the diet was measured in servings per day, making it difficult to determine an actual dose. Therefore, maintaining a high intake of calcium-rich foods maybe one of the best things a bodybuilder/body shaper can do to enhance fat loss and stay lean.
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Re: Calcium

Postby Renfred » Tue Feb 08, 2011 10:24 am

Canuck Singh wrote:A large amount of evidence now supports a relationship between increased calcium intakes and reductions in body weight, specifically fat mass.

The first observations in rats over 10 years ago on through to several recently published clinical studies support this “fat-reduction” relationship. The impact of calcium intake on weight loss or prevention of weight gain has been demonstrated in a wide age range of Caucasian and African-Americans of both genders. A review this year focused on the results of several clinical trials that have investigated the impact of calcium and dairy products on prevention of weight gain, weight loss or development of the insulin resistance syndrome. The conclusions are that calcium plays a substantial contributing role in reducing body weight, particularly fat mass and prevalence of the insulin resistance.

Even more interesting are the findings that dietary calcium also plays a pivotal role in the regulation of energy metabolism. Some researchers have shown that high calcium diets help prevent fat accumulation, increase lipolysis (fat metabolism in fat cells) and preserve thermogenesis during caloric restriction. All these factors accelerate the fat loss process.

The best way to increase your calcium intake, and get lean and stay lean, is by eating low fat dairy foods and green vegetables.

Ref: J. Nutr. 2003 133: 245-248.


Hello dear, Thanks for sharing this info about the calcium, I want more info about calcium and about vitamin E and D.... Would you please share this kind of info with me............??????????
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Re: Calcium

Postby Baron » Wed Jun 12, 2013 2:53 pm

Calcium based foods are more important for the better body growth, better weight management, stronger bones & teeth, and improved immune system. Add natural sources of the calcium i.e milk, yogurt, cheese, citrus fruits, green leafy vegetables etc. in your diet rather than calcium supplements for better physical health.
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