Better deadlift better performance

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Better deadlift better performance

Postby Canuck Singh » Sun Nov 30, 2008 3:42 pm

A recent study* using athletes indicated that the better an athlete does in the deadlift, the better they perform at their particular sport.

The deadlift builds functional strength as it is performed in the basic position of many athletic movements. It strengthens more muscle groups in one movement than any other exercise. While strengthening the core of power; the midsection.

Years of work in this exercise will also give you a <nice> good grip. While the deadlift can be the most performance enhancing exercise, if not executed properly it can also be the most damaging to your body.

To execute the deadlift, place your feet shoulder-width apart (wider if you prefer). The bar on the floor should be resting against your shins. Bend down and grip the bar with a straight back, shoulder width apart, and shoulders over the bar. With the weight evenly balanced through your feet, looking up and ahead, keep your arms straight, lift the barbell by attempting to push your feet through the floor.

Use the force generated through your legs and hips to get the bar moving, not your back. As the bar moves, keep it scraping against your shins and over your knees until you reach the upright position. During the entire movement your back muscles should be locked, traps tensed and arms straight. The deadlift is a simple movement that involves complex interaction of many muscles.

*Strength and Conditioning Journal. 22:5;18-20, 2000
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Re: Better deadlift better performance

Postby Putt_Punjabi » Mon Jan 19, 2009 11:52 am

I thought deadlift was a lower back exercise?
:-\
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Re: Better deadlift better performance

Postby Canuck Singh » Mon Jan 19, 2009 12:47 pm

Putt_Punjabi wrote:I thought deadlift was a lower back exercise?
:-\

:waat: yes it is a lower back exercise, what are you thinking it is?

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Re: Better deadlift better performance

Postby hsingh » Mon Jan 19, 2009 8:49 pm

During my shoulder days, I do a hybrid of deadlift with a shoulder press. Of course, due to the shoulder press, I can not do heavy weights with this.

I do have 1 question though. I train 1 major muscle group per day through the entire week:
Monday - chest
Tuesday - back
Wednesday - legs
Thursday - shoulders
Friday - arms

Where can I fit a deadlift in here? Doesn't seem like it could work anywhere :oops: Muscles need proper rest and all.
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Re: Better deadlift better performance

Postby Canuck Singh » Mon Jan 19, 2009 9:01 pm

During my shoulder days, I do a hybrid of deadlift with a shoulder press. Of course, due to the shoulder press, I can not do heavy weights with this.

I believe that is a clean and press, which does indeed incorporate a deadlift like motion

I do have 1 question though. I train 1 major muscle group per day through the entire week:
Monday - chest
Tuesday - back
Wednesday - legs
Thursday - shoulders
Friday - arms

Where can I fit a deadlift in here? Doesn't seem like it could work anywhere :oops: Muscles need proper rest and all.
Hmm... it depends on what you feel in terms of recovery. I would probably fit it in the same day as legs only because you won't be limited by soreness
But I don't think, especially if you are new at it, that you should be lifting very heavy with deadlift. So technically you can fill it in anywhere and work on form for a while
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Re: Better deadlift better performance

Postby Canuck Singh » Thu Feb 12, 2009 4:21 pm

In the November 2006 issue of CrossFit Journal, Mark Rippetoe published, “A New, Rather Long Analysis of the Deadlift.” He concluded this breakthrough article by identifying three criteria for a correct deadlift starting position:

* The back must be locked in extension.
* The bar must be touching the shins with the feet flat on the floor.
* The shoulders must be out in front of the bar so that the shoulder blades are directly above the bar.


The bar does not leave the floor on heavy pulls until the shoulder blades are over the bar with the bar over the middle of the foot.

“The quadriceps must participate in the deadlift properly in order for the movement to be safe and efficient.”Utilize weightlifting shoes to better utilize the quads.

- If I have a little heel under my shoe, that places my knee in a position that is a little bit forward, maybe three to five degrees more forward than it would be in flat shoes. This increases the quadriceps’ effectiveness off the floor because it increases the knee angle enough that it allows the quadriceps to open the knee up over a longer range of motion.
- If the heel is low enough, there is no compromise between posterior chain recruitment and quadriceps recruitment. You only get that when the heel is too high. The heel on the shoe, while taking a tiny bit of tension off the hamstrings and making it a little bit easier to get into that extended lumbar position, also produces enough increase in the knee angle so that you get a little bit more work out of the quadriceps off the floor.

- If weightlifting shoes facilitate greater quad recruitment from the floor, it seems flat shoes are more advantageous in deadlift assistance exercises like Romanian deadlifts and good mornings that seek to exclude the quads. In deadlift assistance exercises like pulls on blocks and pulls with 35s entailing greater knee extension, weightlifting shoes seem more advantageous.

:?: What is the maximum heel height that you have found to be compatible with keeping the bar over the middle of the foot?
Between 0.625 inches and 0.75 inches.

Sumos: The sumo is a way to increase the verticality of the back angle. This shortens the moment arm between the hip and the bar by effectively shortening the length of the femur when the stance width is increased and by shortening the moment arm between the hip joint and the scapulas when the back angle is made more vertical. It is interesting that there are some people who can’t deadlift efficiently with a conventional stance. For example, some people have femurs and tibias that are so long relative to their back length that they can’t get their back angles much above horizontal without a stance that sufficiently shortens the effective femur length. We found a woman at one of our seminars whose femurs were four inches longer than her back. She had never been able to deadlift conventionally without having the bar ten inches in front of her mid-foot at her start position. When she was in the conventional stance with the bar over her mid-foot, her hips were actually much higher than her scapulas. We put her in a sumo stance, and she got her back at what would be a normal angle for a more proportioned person. She set a PR in her deadlift by 10 kg that day.

Foot angle: There is the necessity for most people—and especially bigger guys—to point the toes out to activate the hip and make room for the gut between the femurs in order to express the correct back angle.

What we find is that if you take your vertical jump stance right under the bar (relatively narrow stance), place the middle of the foot under the bar, and then point your toes out maybe 15–20 degrees, you make it much easier to express the correct back angle when you’re in thoracic and lumbar extension. It also enables you to place a little bit of tension on the adductors with that external rotation. To a certain extent, you can call them into hip extension because the adductors are hip extensors.
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