Battle of the Bulge - Teen Health

Women can discuss training, diet, nutrition, supplementation and other things here. Research specific to females and children will be posted here.

Battle of the Bulge - Teen Health

Postby Canuck Singh » Wed Jul 02, 2008 7:15 pm

Teenages and HD
Do you consider yourself "fit" but still carry a little pudge around the middle? Well this research suggest you still need to do something to get rid of it if you want don't to fall into the high-risk category for heart disease. Being "fit" doesn't appear to be as good a preventative of heart disease as being "lean".

This study assessed the relative strengths of association between coronary heart disease risk status and both body fatness and cardio respiratory (aerobic) fitness in teenage boys and girls.

Over 1000 schoolchildren were assessed in all factors that determine heart disease risk (height, weight, skin-fold thickness, blood pressure, non-fasting serum total and high density lipoprotein cholesterol profiles and a simple aerobic fitness test; a 20-m shuttle run.) Socioeconomic status and habitual physical activity were also determined from questionnaire information. Multiple regression analyses were carried out to examine relationships between all five risk factors, fitness, and fatness.

The main finding of this important research was that there is a much stronger relationship between fatness and heart disease risk factors than between fitness and the same risk factors. The researchers conclude that the observed relationships between aerobic fitness and future heart disease in adolescents are dominated by the level of fat the kids carried, irrespective of how aerobically "fit" they were.

Therefore, if you love your kids and want them to have long, healthy lives, educate them on how to prevent getting fat! As It appears that your degree of "fatness" is the single most effective tool for preventing heart disease later in life.

Ref: Med Sci Sports Exerc. 33(2):270-4, 2001.
User avatar
Canuck Singh
Site Admin
 
Posts: 1660
Joined: Thu Jun 05, 2008 6:40 pm
Location: Vancouver Canada

Re: Battle of the Bulge - Teen Health

Postby Canuck Singh » Sun Jul 06, 2008 5:33 pm

Don't Live next to a fast food restaurant:
rs. French, Harnack, and Jeffery at the Epidemiology Division, School of Public Health, University of Minnesota, have produced some fascinating research on factors that affect body fat levels within our modern society.

The scientists demonstrated that people who live close to fast food restaurants are, in fact, fatter than those who live farther away and it's simply because they visit these fast-food establishments more often. These results show that demographic and behavioral influences profoundly affect our food choices and these choices have significant impact on our long-term health.

This three-year study of 891 adult women revealed that frequency of fast food restaurant visits was associated with higher food intake, higher percentage fat intake, more frequent consumption of hamburgers, french fries, and soft drinks, and less frequent consumption of fiber and fruit.

Frequency of fast food restaurant visits was higher among younger women, those with lower income, greater body fat, and lower dietary restraint. Increases in frequency of fast food restaurant use were also associated with low physical activity and greater television viewing.

So if you are moving to a new house and are prone to gaining a few pounds, tell your real estate agent not to show you anything close to the golden arches.

Ref: Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord. 24(10):1353-9,2000.
User avatar
Canuck Singh
Site Admin
 
Posts: 1660
Joined: Thu Jun 05, 2008 6:40 pm
Location: Vancouver Canada
---------


Return to Female Training & Children's Health

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 0 guests

cron