All About Whey

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All About Whey

Postby Canuck Singh » Wed Jun 25, 2008 6:01 pm

Whey is the component of milk making up 20% of protein fractions.

Casein is the other component of milk making up obviously 80% of protein fractions.

A typical 250mL glass of milk contains 9g of protein, ~1.8g of whey, and 7g of casein.

Cheese, yoghurt, butter and other components of milk are obtained from various ways of isolating the curds of whey, or malai as punjabi's know of it.

Whey protein is isolated from milk via Ion-exchange, Cross-filtered microfiltration or other methods. Enzymes used are completely synthetic and done in controlled food regulated environments.

Whey is a milk protein, and it is as such designated a Lacto-vegetarian food.
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Re: All About Whey

Postby AmardeepSingh » Thu Aug 28, 2008 10:32 pm

I've been warned to be carefull with some icre creams that contain Whey because the Whey used has rennet in it. This article explains that the enzymes are synthetic, is this the case for most whey protein supplements? Perhaps the whey in the ice cream is made using vegetarian or synthetic rennet

Any information about whey containing rennet? which products to look out for, etc?
Canuck Singh wrote:Whey protein is isolated from milk via Ion-exchange, Cross-filtered microfiltration or other methods. Enzymes used are completely synthetic and done in controlled food regulated environments.

Whey is a milk protein, and it is as such designated a Lacto-vegetarian food.
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Re: All About Whey

Postby Canuck Singh » Thu Aug 28, 2008 10:44 pm

It is tough to say because you will not be able to get details from manufacturers who are the base supply for a certain product.

On the other hand, the rennet does not end up in the final product of the food material. For example, it would then need to be listed on the ingredients list (such as gelatin of capsules).

If anyone is consuming milk items, consider that they do come from the teets of the cow in the first place and naturally it is going to contain items from the inner workings of the animal.

Usually the consumer is left with going on the ingredients list, or contacting the manufacturer. However, just to give an example, one company brand X, may get their food product sourced from new zealand, australia, south africa etc. They may not know what the original sourcing is. As well most food products are produced in factories where other non-vegan items may have been on the production line. So when it comes to consumer consciousness you will have to make endeavours to understand the bottom production line.

If anyone has concerns unto this situation, there are options of gemma protein, rice protein, soy protein. Yet, you may want to contact the manufacturer to get the real information on this.

Here is an example production process for some whey products: (note that Whey is seperated by either ion-exchange, cross filteration leaving a pure end product)

Precuring at a Warm Temperature (Acidify the Milk)
|
Coloring
|
Coagulation by Rennet
|
Separation of the Whey

The truth is that standard cheeses made in the US and UK do not use animal-based rennet, with few exceptions; microbial (artificial) rennet has become the norm in these nations. In fact! (some Organic cheese is made with meat-based rennet, as artificial microbial rennet is deemed not natural and it thus does not meet organic standards.) Go figure on that one!

Also, because the Jewish community is quite staunch about getting things Kosher, you can be quite sure that if something is labelled as Kosher, or Vegetarian it is usually free of animal based products. However, this does not mean that the item was not produced on the same line in a factory where other items may have been produced. But we have to trust food control standards that items are cleaned and of high quality as it is food and must be regulated.

Also from Wikipedia:
"Because of the above imperfections of microbial rennets, some producers sought further replacements of natural rennet. With the development of genetic engineering, it suddenly became possible to use calf genes to modify some bacteria, fungi or yeasts to make them produce chymosin. Chymosin produced by genetically modified organisms was the first artificially produced enzyme to be registered and allowed by the FDA in the USA. In 1999, about 60% of U.S. hard cheese was made with genetically engineered chymosin[2]. One example of a commercially available genetically engineered rennet is Chymax, created by Pfizer.

Today the most widely used genetically engineered rennet is produced by the fungus Aspergillus niger. The problems of destroying the aflatoxins or the antibiotic-resistant marker genes seem to be solved.[citation needed]

Cheese production with genetically engineered rennet is similar to production with natural calf rennet. Genetic rennet contains only one of the known main chymosin types, either type A or type B. Other chymosin types found in natural rennet do not exist in genetic rennet. This is also the reason why special analysis can determine what kind of coagulant has been used by analyzing what bonds have and haven't been cleaved.

Often a mixture of genetically engineered chymosin and natural pepsin is used to imitate the complexity of natural rennet and to get the same results in coagulation and in development of flavour and taste.

The so-called "GM rennets" are suitable for vegetarians if there was no animal based alimentation used during the production in the fermenter—but only for vegetarians who are not opposed to GM-derived foods."

I hope this article helps.
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Re: All About Whey

Postby Canuck Singh » Sun Aug 31, 2008 7:00 pm

Here is an example to the contrary: WHEY PROTEIN is manufactured using a vegetarian rennet enzyme and is specially processed to concentrate and preserve glutamine. The process of digesting whey, such as that found in peptides and hydrolyzed whey products, results in a loss of glutamine. Therefore, Jarrow FORMULAS® WHEY PROTEIN is NOT hydrolyzed. Also, WHEY PROTEIN is extremely rich in essential amino acids. ()

Again it takes digging up evidence, but from all the manufacturer's I contacted only some parts of EU and Asia still use animal rennet.

Additionally, if someone is concerned about these issues they should make sure to contact the manufacturer's. The only way change is going to happen is if the consumers are vigilant about not accepting certain things from their foods.

Also from the whey protein institute:
Q: Is Whey Protein A Good Choice For Vegetarians?

A: Whey protein is a dairy protein and comes from cow's milk. It does NOT come from animal flesh. In the United States whey protein is a co-product of the cheese making process and in most cases a microbial type of rennet is used in the manufacturing process. Whey protein is acceptable for any vegetarian diet that allows dairy products including lacto-ovo, lacto, and ovo types of vegetarian diets

Again, how much that percent is one can not say. But companies like Jarrow explicitly state it, or you can contact the manufacturer for confirmation .
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Re: All About Whey

Postby Canuck Singh » Fri Sep 05, 2008 1:05 am

Update:

Here is an email from a manufacturer that I get my supplements from:

"None of the cheese processes that our whey is made from uses animal enzymes rennet.

VP Sales/Marketing"
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Re: All About Whey

Postby Canuck Singh » Mon Sep 08, 2008 9:34 pm

Of all the macronutrients, protein has the most exceptional appetite-suppressing effects. However, a recent study suggests that whey maybe the most effective protein at suppressing hunger and make dieting for fat loss, easier.

In a series of trials, consumption of whey protein before a meal significantly reduced hunger and increased the feeling of satiety from eating less food. When the participants drank a whey protein shake 30 minutes before a meal they felt more satisfied from consuming fewer calories. The researchers discovered that whey stimulates much higher levels of two gastrointestinal hormones that control appetite; cholecystokinin and glucagon-like peptide-1. Consuming whey increased the levels of these hormones by 60% compared with drinking a regular protein (casein) supplement.

Source: Journal of Nutrition, 2005.
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Re: All About Whey

Postby Canuck Singh » Mon Sep 22, 2008 4:28 am

A recent study compared the effects of casein and whey protein as the source of dietary protein on the activity of lipogenic enzymes in the liver and skeletal muscle of rats. Lipogenic enzymes serve to synthesize and accumulate fat. After two weeks of exercise, a significant decrease in the activity of liver lipogenic enzymes was observed in the rodents fed whey proteins.

The researchers concluded that whey protein may play an important role in suppressing liver fatty acid synthesis, thereby decreasing accumulation of body fat. Whey protein supplementation also improved the activity of muscle enzymes that help to burn fat for fuel during exercise. These results need to be confirmed in humans but they do support other studies on rodents that show whey proteins enable better fat utilization in the hours after exercise.

An improved ability to burn fat and a decreased capacity to store fat are two more good reasons why Whey Isolate should be a staple of any bodybuilder’s diet.

Source: Nutrition, October, 2005.
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Re: All About Whey

Postby Canuck Singh » Mon Sep 22, 2008 4:37 am

The results of a study completed at Lund University in Sweden suggest that adding whey protein to the end of meal may result in better blood glucose control during the day.

Blood glucose fluctuations cause people to get irritated, hungry and crave foods they usually wouldn’t/shouldn’t eat. Fluctuating blood glucose levels not only make sticking to a calorie-controlled diet a tough task, it promotes muscle breakdown and fat storage. These are two things a person must avoid if they’re after a better looking physique. Conversely, maintaining steady blood glucose levels reduce hunger, preserve muscle and promote better fat metabolism.

This research showed that adding a dose of high quality whey protein to breakfast and lunch, resulted in steadier blood glucose control. Scientists aren’t sure why this benefit occurs but it’s probably due to a high concentration of amino acids that evoke an insulin response and their effect on hormones that control blood glucose regulation
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Re: All About Whey

Postby Canuck Singh » Sun Sep 28, 2008 3:54 am

In a study using rodents, Japanese scientists have reported that supplementation with whey protein had a direct effect on fat metabolism, unlike other protein sources like casein and soy.

The rodents fed whey protein showed a decrease in fatty acid synthesis in the liver and increased fat utilization in muscle. Most interestingly, these results were similar to that observed in rodents placed on an exercise program.

Aside from whey protein’s unique capacity to stimulate muscle protein synthesis, the researchers suggested that whey protein may also improve fat metabolism that may result in a reduction in body fat during exercise.

Source: Nutrition, 21; 105-1058, 2005.
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