All about Protein

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All about Protein

Postby Canuck Singh » Tue Jun 24, 2008 7:42 pm

Add Air to that Shake

Adding air (by using a blender) to your protein shakes appears to increase the feeling of satiety while consuming fewer calories.

Researchers from Penn State University adjusted the volume of protein shakes consumed by subjects by increasing or decreasing the blending time and subsequent air content. The subjects all consumed a protein shake 30 minutes before a meal. All the shakes were equal in protein, carbohydrate and calorie content. The only difference being the volume of the shake by way of air content.

The subjects that consumed a protein shake that was blended longer (to increase the air content), consumed fewer calories (an average of 12%) during the next meal. The increased air content appeared to give the subjects a feeling of fullness. So that when they did eat a meal, they tended not to eat as much. Even a 12% decrease in calorie consumption is very significant when dieting. Especially if you add up all the shakes you may consume during the week.

By blending your protein shakes a bit longer will increase its total volume by increasing its air content. This may allow you to feel more satisfied after a meal containing less calories. I may prove to be a neat little trick you can employ when attempting to reduce total calorie consumption and lose body fat.

Ref: Amer J Clin Nutr 72:361,2000.
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Re: All about Protein

Postby Canuck Singh » Mon Jul 21, 2008 2:00 pm

How much?
Many nutritionists and health care professionals recite the USDA’s protein recommendations as adequate for everyone, even athletes who want to build muscle.

Scientists such as Gianni Bolio and Peter Reeds are the real experts on human protein metabolism.

In a paper published in Current Opinion in Clinical Nutrition and Metabolic Care (June 2002), these scientists presented the facts on what we know and do not know about protein nutrition for healthy and sick people. In this report the scientists’ state, “based on the fact we know so little about the various functions of amino acids at both the mechanistic and quantitative level, the current dietary recommendations for both healthy and sick humans is intellectually unsatisfactory”. This is a polite way of suggesting health care professionals have been ignorant as <peace> about their dietary protein recommendations.

These scientists raised the concern that health care professionals make definitive recommendations about protein requirements for various populations when science knows so little about human protein metabolism. These scientists also advise that maintaining an adequate lean body mass is a crucial indicator of the overall health of the individual and that consuming foods that enhance glutathione production is important for optimal health.

The scientists go so far as to suggest that the health of many different populations, not just athletes, would be enhanced by a higher intake of protein-rich foods. For optimal health all people should make protein intake a top priority. Since we know that excess protein and amino intake is shown to be harmless in healthy people, it is a far better choice to consume more protein-rich foods than to restrict protein intake.

What is the best protein source that enhances health? Whey protein derived from Milk!
Ref: Current Opin Clin Nutr Metab Care. June 2002
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Re: All about Protein

Postby Canuck Singh » Mon Jul 21, 2008 2:21 pm

Amino Acids
One of the key factors to gaining drug free muscle was the amount of circulating amino acids in the blood at all times. A recent study confirms directly that amino acid availability in the blood does, in fact, govern protein synthesis rates in muscle.

Protein synthesis is the overriding mechanism that determines net gains in muscle mass. To build muscle you have to maximize stimulation of muscle protein synthesis rates while minimizing protein breakdown.

Scot Kimball and Leonard Jefferson from Pennsylvania State University, College of Medicine have recently published a paper that fits together some of the missing pieces of the muscle growth puzzle. A high level of amino acid circulating within the blood triggers uptake by muscle that in turn stimulates an increase in protein synthesis rates. The higher the level of amino acids in the blood, the more dramatic the stimulation of protein synthesis in muscle.

When blood amino acid levels drop, muscle-building rates are shut down. Theoretically, if one can maintain a high level of circulating amino acids in the blood, 24-hours a day, every day, then dramatic gains in lean mass are assured.

Milk whey protein's unique absorption and assimilation capabilities enable large amounts of the growth-stimulating amino acids to be delivered to muscle.

Other foods or proteins don’t have the absorption kinetics to produce the ultra high blood amino acid concentrations that whey produces. You must maintain high levels of the right blend amino acids each day and every day.

Ref: Current Opinion in Clinical Nutrition and Metabolic Care 5:63-67, 2002.
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Re: All about Protein

Postby Alexbit » Mon Nov 21, 2011 10:49 am

Hi dude,.
I thinks Protein is so essential to the body that without it the body would not exist. It is found in every single part of the body including the hair, skin, bones and muscles.

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